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A nose for the future Robert Hickson Oct 23

It’s been a big time for noses recently. Who would have picked that?
First up, a paper in PLOS ONE  indicated that losing one’s sense of smell may be a predictor (statistically speaking) of your demise (at least if you are older than 57). The authors speculate
Olfactory function is thus one of the strongest predictors of 5-year mortality and may serve as a bellwether for slowed cellular regeneration or as a marker of cumulative toxic environmental exposures.
Many folk, young and old, have sniffed at these results, proclaiming that they can’t smell a thing and have been hale and hearty for many …

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Food, Fossil Fuels and Filthy Finance Bryan Walker Oct 23

It is depressingly apparent that powerful forces in the global economy are set to carry on with the exploration for and use of fossil fuels as a primary source of …

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 – what really happened? Ken Perrott Oct 23

Three months after the loss of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 over Ukraine the world is no wiser about what and who caused this crash. Well we have the preliminary report but …

Thirsty trees and water yields: Vegetation, water and a changing climate Waiology Oct 23

By Cate Macinnis-Ng Future climate projections predict that some parts of New Zealand will become drier with droughts being more severe and frequent. This is particularly true for the north …

The low down on liquefaction Lynley Hargreaves Oct 22

Since the Canterbury earthquakes most of us are familiar with the effects of liquefaction – sand volcanoes sunken buildings and vast vast quantities of mud. But scientists still don’t fully …

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