SciBlogs

Posts Tagged humour

quirky science demonstrations Alison Campbell Oct 20

No Comments

A very brief post before I dive back into marking!

My friend Cathy pointed me at this short, fascinating video that shows some quirky chemistry & physics demonstrations (afficionados of Facebook will find it here). I had a couple of ‘wow!’ moments while watching it; science teachers will probably get the same response when sharing it with their classes.

Thanks, cathy :)

acapella science does eminem Alison Campbell Jul 17

No Comments

It’s not biology but this video is too good not to share :) I’ve always had a soft spot for acapella singing, & acapella science is just wonderful as an example of combining music & science communication. (Those who want the lyrics will find them here at Scientific American.)

6-second science Alison Campbell Jun 23

No Comments

This video is a compilation of the best clips from the ‘Six-second science fair’ run by GE recently. (Apparently it attracted more than 600 entries!)

Could be really interesting to set something like this as a classroom project – rapidly changing technology (including the apps) has really opened up the options :)

a bunch of fascinating animals you’ve never heard of… Alison Campbell May 30

No Comments

… unless you’ve been following this blog for a while, in which case you may already have read about the sarcastic fringeheads (who are not members of a rock band, despite the wonderful name!).

The dumbo octopus, the pacu (a fish with teeth like nutcrackers, an attribute that has given rise to an urban myth guaranteed to alarm men), the pink fairy armadillo – yes, really! – visit the IFLS webpage and read all about them!

a bunch of fascinating animals you’ve never heard of… Alison Campbell May 30

No Comments

… unless you've been following this blog for a while, in which case you may already have read about the sarcastic fringeheads (who are not members of a rock band, despite the wonderful name!).

The dumbo octopus, the pacu (a fish with teeth like nutcrackers, an attribute that has given rise to an urban myth guaranteed to alarm men), the pink fairy armadillo – yes, really! – visit the IFLS webpage and read all about them!

an entertaining take on plants & plant cells Alison Campbell Mar 02

No Comments

The new semester kicks off tomorrow & right now I'm adding resources to my first-year bio moodle page & running through the powerpoints for the week's lectures. After a couple of introductory sessions we're diving into the section of the class that focuses on plants, and I'm giving some serious thought to how I present that material given that it looks like more than half the class didn't study the relevant year 12 Achievement Standard. 

So among other things I've looked around for some engaging short videos on plant biology, and I found this one (part of what looks like a great sequence, which I've bookmarked for future use): 

OK, I know the humour might not appeal to everyone, & he does speak rather fast at times, but the presenter's engaging, the graphics are good & the key points are emphasised and repeated – a nice little primer for my class to watch for homework as preparation for making sense of plants.

homeopathic first aid Alison Campbell Feb 23

2 Comments

Some of my fellow Skeptics have been discussing a homeopath who offers courses in ‘homeopathic first-aid for the home’. Might work for dehydration, I suppose, given that a 30C dilution (that’s a 1 in 100 dilution, repeated 30 times) will have nothing in it but water… But I rather think that homeopathic arnica - recommended here for acute trauma! – would have been worse than useless the time that the Significant Other’s leg interacted with a heavy, sharp, falling object  – give me real-world first aid any day!

Mitchell & Webb said it all, really.
;

 

of whale poo, wolves, and spiny s*x Alison Campbell Feb 20

No Comments

Whales – competing with us for food, or helping to sustain the phytoplankton production on which most life in the oceans depends? The story and video at this link make a good case for the latter. 

Then there's the wolves – their return to Yellowstone Park in the US has led to a whole cascade of environmental changes: changes that are very much for the better. Because the wolves keep the elk population moving around & to some degree under control in terms of population size, the vegetation has had a chance to recover from overgrazing. Forest regrowth along the riverbanks has stabilised those banks and contributed to an improvement in water quality. Beaver populations have bounced back & their activity has further altered the landscape in ways that have seen other species return or recover. The wolves have benefited the park's ecosystem in ways that nobody had predicted.

As for the final topic, well… I have occasionally been asked by much younger, smaller persons how hedgehogs "do it" (the answer being, "carefully!"). In fact Nanny Ogg had a hum'rous song on that very topic. Brian Switek discusses the issue as it might relate to stegasaurs in My Beloved Brontosaurus. And then there are porcupines, animals for whom it seems all coitus must be consensual (unlike ducks, bedbugs, & dolphins, to name just three). Because anything else really wouldn't work…

should one emit flatulent gases silently, or with gusto? Alison Campbell Nov 16

No Comments

I must admit, I’d never really thought about this one (although I suspect littlies would find it amusing). However, it does appear that silence, in this case, is definitely not golden (and it’s got a lot to do withe the mixture of gases produced during bacterial fermentation in the gut).

 

drawing fractals Alison Campbell Aug 27

No Comments

I’ve just stumbled across this rather lovely video on mathematical doodling. Learn to draw fractals, maths snowflakes & more. Even dragons! What’s not to like? YouTube Preview Image

Network-wide options by YD - Freelance Wordpress Developer