SciBlogs

Posts Tagged new zealand

In the summer Brendan Moyle Nov 17

No Comments

A few summers back we visited Waiheke Island. This was the classic NZ holiday, a rustic campground (no power) with days of sunshine. It’s got a lot to recommend it.  It’s also nice to get the chance to put in some time photographing different subjects. It’s hard during the standard working week to squeeze in much time with the camera.  There are a lot of other things that take priority.

The first shot is a skyline of Auckland from Waiheke Island around dusk.  I’ve had to use a 300mm lens to focus on the city.  It’s actually a bit of a way off.  That early evening however, had a lot of appeal. It’s a distinctive shot of a scene I’ve not seen replicated in years.

#1 Red Auckland

The next shot is of one of those gorgeous little bays on Waiheke Island.  We spent a lot of time kayaking or swimming there.  

#2 Summer

The next shot has a kind of texture I felt suited a back and white treatment.  It’s a coastal Manuka tree that’s suffered a bit of exposure of the years.  

All shots are also in my ‘Natural Goodness‘ album.

Hope you enjoyed the scenes :)

An NZ maelstrom Brendan Moyle Nov 14

No Comments

The Huka Falls is in a narrow ravine that connects Lake Taupo with the Waikato River.  At this point you get to see what over 200,000 litres of water per second looks like. This provides the opportunity for some dramatic photography.  Hence these two shots.  These shots were taken during steady rain.  This has the effect of adding a bit of atmosphere and thinning out the tourists.  The defect is having to shield the camera from rain to prevent drops appearing on the front element.  I used a strategically placed hand, which ruined a few shots when the hand crept into the top frame of the pic.

Anyway, something wild and furious from NZ.

Both shots are in the photo album “Natural Goodness

 

 

 

 

 

Sated- Female Sparrow Brendan Moyle Nov 05

2 Comments

It seems odd that with sparrows Passer domesticus being a common (and introduced) bird here in NZ, I’ve taken so few pictures of them. It reflects I guess, my strong preference for photographing native birds rather than introduced. The population in NZ is based on releases in the late 1800s and sparrows flourished.

I guess the two main challenges is that they are a reasonably drab bird and they’re also relatively small. The first issue makes it difficult to take a picture that pops out at you. Rainbow lorikeets are much easier :)  The second is you have to be very close to get a view of the bird that doesn’t require heroic cropping.

I managed both feats last week down at Lake Pupuke. Timing was in the early evening during the golden hour.  And with no-one else around, the birds seemed a little less wary. 

One female sparrow was reasonably photogenic, posing in some lovely early evening light. Shots taken with my a700 and 300/4 G lens.

Close-up of the bird

Wild NZ Brendan Moyle Oct 28

No Comments

One of the great things about New Zealand is we're not starved for good landscape scenes. On the other hand the weather isn't always cooperative. In fact, the thing about being on an Oceanic Island is that the weather can change a lot. Sometimes I can choose when to go out and photograph. Sometimes you don't get any choice.

A case in point was our expedition to the West Coast last summer. I envisaged lovely summer weather, sunshine and glorious pictures of the Fox Glacier and the like. Instead it rained, a lot. We got hit with floods in Golden Bay. We seemed to be under a near constant rain cloud that whole trip. Ok, it wasn't that bad, there were definitely good moments. But overall, the visions were not being served.

Fox Glacier was pretty poor weather. My goal of pristine shots of massive walls of ice were instantly thwarted. Nonetheless, there's a way to make the experience more genuine. Try to use the gray skies, rains and cloud to convey a different impression of the area. Hence these shots of the area.



Wild NZ – Fox Glacier


Wild NZ – Twisted Rock


Wild NZ – Spilled Rock



All shots from this album)

For more photos please visit my
|Zenfolio website|

Wild NZ Brendan Moyle Oct 28

No Comments

One of the great things about New Zealand is we’re not starved for good landscape scenes.  On the other hand the weather isn’t always cooperative.  In fact, the thing about being on an Oceanic Island is that the weather can change a lot.  Sometimes I can choose when to go out and photograph.  Sometimes you don’t get any choice.

A case in point was our expedition to the West Coast last summer.  I envisaged lovely summer weather, sunshine and glorious pictures of the Fox Glacier and the like.  Instead it rained, a lot.  We got hit with floods in Golden Bay. We seemed to be under a near constant rain cloud that whole trip. Ok, it wasn’t that bad, there were definitely good moments.  But overall, the visions were not being served.

Fox Glacier was pretty poor weather.  My goal of pristine shots of massive walls of ice were instantly thwarted.  Nonetheless, there’s a way to make the experience more genuine.   Try to use the gray skies, rains and cloud to convey a different impression of the area. Hence these shots of the area.

 

Wild NZ – Fox Glacier

Wild NZ – Twisted Rock

Wild NZ – Spilled Rock

Bird photo for Friday Brendan Moyle May 10

No Comments

It really feels like winter has arrived in New Zealand. The recent torrential rain and dips in temperature have signaled the warm dry weather is at an end. With the onset of winter comes the local birds foraging for food. Their searches become increasingly demanding as their warm weather food sources wane.

This is the time of the year when we get the local groups of tauhou (silver-eyes) visiting. These small birds like the 'high octane' diet of nectar and fruit.



NZ Tunnelwebs Brendan Moyle Dec 11

No Comments

These large lurking spiders are common in the NZ bush. Their nocturnal habits though mean they are rarely seen by people. On occasion they do wander into people's houses. We had one crawl across the kitchen floor earlier on afternoon. Fortunately in our house we keep a cool head around large spiders. Actually we tend to be enthusiastic greeters to such arachnids.

Nonetheless, the best time to see these spiders is at night. It is extremely rare to see them out of their tunnels. Nonetheless, I managed it with this large beauty. This is the NZ Hexathelid Hexatheles hochstetteri – one of the very first species from NZ to be described.

This Mygalomorph spider is unusual for having 6 spinnerets rather than 4. They are some of New Zealand's largest (by weight) spiders.

#1 Wanderer


#2 Closeup- the small eyes are clustered at the front edge of the carapace


#3 Adapted to kill- the spines on the front legs help trap the prey long enough for the fangs to strike


—–
For more photos please visit
|Zenfolio Albums| or |Committed Photography|

Monday #Macro: Under the Cover of the Night Brendan Moyle Sep 17

No Comments

One of the reasons to attempt photography at night time is you get the chance to see behaviours that don't occur during the day. This means nocturnal creatures come out, spiders repair their webs and other high-risk activities occur. One of these is mating. For arthropods, mating is a high-risk activity. It means you have to abandon the usual routines that protect you from predation. You have to search for a potential mate, succeed with the liaison and avoid predators while exposed. One solution is to attempt this at night time because many avian predators will be fast asleep- or have difficulty locating you.

This led to the spotting of two crane-flies locked in coitus





This shot used my new Macro twin Flash with the side-arm on the right extended and angled to give some side light and pick out more fine detail on the antenna and body hairs. I also had a 6x Raynox adapter attached to the macro lens.

Scenic photos from Mokoroa #Stream Brendan Moyle Sep 08

No Comments

This is definitely one of the most picturesque nature reserves I've visited in the West Auckland area. It's sometimes hard to believe what can be found in a 30-45 minute drive from home. Well, there's also the hiking, but that adds to the pleasure.

The minor issue was cutting my fingers out in the bush, so bleeding was an added hassle. Some of my gear has a new patina of red :/

#1 A momentary respite


#2 Rush


#3 Steps


Larger versions of these Mokoroa photos can be viewed at:
|Zenfolio Albums| or |Committed Photography|

Take me to the river: Mokoroa #Waterfall Brendan Moyle Sep 06

No Comments

The Mokoroa Stream includes a waterfall. In fact, it consists of twin falls as two streams feed into it.

This fall is quite spectacular, but the constant water spray ruined many of my shots


The other fall is more picturesque than powerful. The mature trees at the top of the falls gives some idea of the scale.


The flow of water over the rock faces is appealing.


Larger versions of these Mokoroa photos can be viewed at:
|Zenfolio Albums| or |Committed Photography|




Network-wide options by YD - Freelance Wordpress Developer