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NZISF logo

Running from July 6th to 11th, New Zealand’s International Science Festival hits the streets.

For many it may be better known as mainly for kids.

There is of course a huge programme for kids, but there is also a busy programme for adults, which I am going to focus on here.

To book on-line, click on the details page of the event that interest you; if booking is needed a link to book for that event is near the bottom of the page along with the time and venue details.

Here’s a teaser.

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(Source NZ ISF website)

Eating. Dining In the Dark. Fine dining while blind-folded with food prepared by Julie Biuso, Julie Woods and ’the team at Otago Polytechnic TECHnique Restaurant’. (Booking essential for this and other food events as places are limited.)

Drinking. For beer quaffers, Richard Emerson (of Emerson’s Brewery) and colleagues present beer and amuse-bouche hors d’oeuvre in more than just words. On wine, 2010 NZ Winemaker of the Year from Quartz Reef Rudi Bauer will teach a class for those wanting to make (or better understand) Otago’s ’name’ wine, Pinot Noir.

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Movies. Full-length version of Donated To Science, introduced by Prof. Helen Nicholson before screening, followed by producer/director Paul Trotman speaking about the film and the Still Life: The Art of Anatomy exhibition (also part of the festival programme), then refreshments. See also my earlier article for an introduction to this film.

Theatre. In The science of sin, Chris KP and his live band The Virtuous Pagans follow Dante’s path exploring human behaviour, morality and the essence of sin with a scientific perspective. (A theatre then dining option is available, which apparently includes the ultimate decadent dessert. The ultimate in sin?)

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Discussions. Café Sci, Balancing Our Economy and the Environment (In a lecture room, not the usual informal setting for a Café Sci event.) Science for New Zealand: What Do We Want? (This no doubt will have a lot of scientists wanting to share their views, not just the public. Those who have followed Shaun Hendy’s articles on science and productivity may want to attend too.)

Talks. Explorer Tim Jarvis on water; Why People Eat What They Eat — The psychology of food; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Greenhouse Gas; …

Art and science. Including winners from the Otago School of Medical Sciences photographic ’science as art’ competition, artists that use science and technology as inspiration and the Still Life: The Art of Anatomy exhibition.

If you’re interested enough in science to be here at sciblogs, you want to be there. Surely.

The festival also has a blog, a Facebook page and you can follow them on twitter.


Other articles on Code for life:

Caf̩ scientifique Рlost in translation?

Royal Society publishing free to read, 1665 – today

Basic fluid science on the space station

Oliver Sacks on Hallucinations