4 Comments

Tomorrow the local television channel, Channel 9, features two documentaries that might interest local readers. One covers the use of 1080 to control pests, the other the covered stadium under construction.

Let me first start with a short documentary that I encountered while researching for this post, which show great footage of New Zealand bats and discusses the impact of 1080 control on assisting conservation efforts to help them. I’ll confess it is the footage of the bats that appeals! They look great little beasts.

YouTube Preview Image

As everyone in New Zealand will know, a major development in Dunedin is a covered stadium. The issue has split rate-payers who are covering the bulk of the cost of construction. University of Otago will be using facilities at the complex. I’ve been watching it rise, the size and the span of those beams are impressive.

The greyness is cloudy evening light!

At 7:30pm on Sunday 26th, the first of a series of documentaries will screen ’exploring the history of Dunedin’s Stadium and a look into the features on offer.’ If you haven’t seen the stadium, you can view it from a local webcam and Our Stadium. Progress updates and reports can be found at What if…? Dunedin (formerly Dunedin Stadium). There’s also a Facebook page of course.

Following this, at 8pm, is a documentary from graduates of the Otago University Centre for Science Communication that looks at the use of 1080 (sodium monofluoroacetate) for pest control. (For any overseas readers that have gotten this far into my post this is used to tackle pests in our wilderness areas, possums, mice and rats in particular.) A trailer to the documentary can be viewed below, also available via the film makers’ blog with comments.

YouTube Preview Image

(I’ve yet to see this production, so I can’t offer any opinions on it.)


Other articles on Code for life:

Autism – looking for parent-of-origin effects

Descent into a boiling volcano crater, and puffing smoke rings

Coiling bacterial DNA

Neurological shorts

Preserving endangered species – of gut microbes