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Introducing New Zealander readers to a free-to-air documentary series that might interest those with science-y tastes.

blood-and-guts-cover

Science-y documentaries are relatively rare on free-to-air television in New Zealand. With that justification I’d like to give a head’s up to a new documentary series screening on Prime Television, Sundays at 9:35pm, starting this Sunday (January 23rd).

Blood and guts: A History of Surgery is a BBC production accompanied by Richard Hollingham’s book (cover shown to left; click on the cover image to read reviews at Good Reads).

Having not seen it I can’t offer a review myself but remarks found on-line are very favourable. An oft-repeated comment, however, is that viewers who are squeamish about close-ups of surgery may prefer to divert their attention from time to time.

The BioethnicsBytes blog looks at the third episode, Spare Parts, discussing (to no surprise) some of the the ethnical issues of transplants of external limbs or features.

The opening episode (this Sunday) looks at the history of brain surgery, a topic I have read a little about and there are fascinating stories to become acquainted with.

Episodes are: Into The Brain, Bleeding Hearts, Spare Parts, Fixing Faces and Bloody Beginnings.

Let others know what you think of the show. (If you’ve already see it (perhaps you’re an overseas readers), but all means chip in with your thoughts. Try avoid spoilers!)


Other articles on Code for life:

Understanding the brain through controlling it

Positive news

Fact or fallacy, a survey of immunisation statements in the print media

Seeking science-y reading?

Consumer brain-computer interface