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Stephen Curry has released his film, I’m a scientist. An introduction to the film can be found on the website hosting the film. He’s written about the making of the film on his blog, Reciprocal Space. (Do head over, read what he has to say and give him feedback.) There are even trailers!

The film features himself as presenter ’interviewing six scientists who are at different stages of their careers. They were kind enough to share their stories of how they got into science and to talk about why they like doing it and what they think it takes to be a good scientist. Most importantly of all, they reveal their favourite type of cheese.’

(I have to admit when I think of films and cheese together, I think of the Wallace and Gromit movies from Aardman Animations.)

Stephen’s film is, in his own words, ’[…] made with teenage school-children in mind but I hope it will also appeal to other students, teachers and the general public, and maybe even to other scientists.’

Despite this, I think many others will be interested in what these six people have to say. Scientists, too, may find it interesting to compare notes, as it were.

Before I leave you to it, one sound bite. When asked if you need to be a bit of a genius to do science Marcia Philbin replies:

No, I’m not a genius. I’m just somebody who knows what she likes to do and when she’s interested in something works hard at it and I will remain focused, determined, committed and I will keep trying. That’s the key thing. To keep trying.

This in an informal interview is a damn fine answer if you ask me. Lawrence Pearl later adds ’a sort-of bloody-minded refusal not to fail.’

They’re good interviews, enjoy it:

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Other articles on Code for life:

Local events: science story telling, non-academic careers, doctors and evidence (features ScienceTeller)

The first science films

Not Darwin’s tree of life

Free books: basic statistics, evolution and origin of man

How did you learn to critique the scientific literature?

Temperature-induced hearing loss