Science blogging in the New Zealand media

By Grant Jacobs 20/03/2012 4


My article for today is over at Nature’s Soapbox Science.

During a recent Royal Institution discussion that I was following on-line via twitter Fiona Fox, head of the UK Science Media Centre (SMC), was reported as saying that ’blogs are fantastic but no journalists goes to them to look for full stories — must be realistic’. I thought that this wasn’t the experience of those writing here at the Sciblogs and suggested as much in reply.

Lou Woodley, on-line editor for Nature’s community forum and blogs and who was part of our on-line conversation, invited me to write a guest blog expanding on this. With the help of others writing here (huge thanks!), I have outlined some of the interactions with the New Zealand media we have experienced and offered a few thoughts as to why we experience this interaction.


A selection of articles on science communication at Code for life:

Communicating complex and post-normal science to the policy maker and the public — lessons from New Zealand

What should be taught in science communication courses?

When the abstract or conclusions aren’t accurate or enough

Of use of the active voice by scientists

Media thought: Ask what is known, not the expert’s opinion


4 Responses to “Science blogging in the New Zealand media”

  • Excellent post, Grant (just got back from reading it on the Nature site) :-) Nice to see everything pulled together like this & I enjoyed your commentary.

  • Nice work Grant. It goes to show just how much of an impact the blogosphere is having on the mainstream media, particularly in countries where there aren’t science editors and science columnists in media organisations.

  • Thanks guys.

    Peter – somewhere in “It goes to show just how much of an impact the blogosphere is having on the mainstream media, particularly in countries where there aren’t science editors and science columnists in media organisations.” we need to say “and there are people like you”! 😉 I think you’re right, but also that in the situation you describe (lack of science editors/columnists) Science Media Centres have a useful role in exposing the media to science blogging and generally connecting media with those scientists who are making their own efforts to reach out to a wider audience like our lot are. The facilitating thing.

Site Meter