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The Emerging Researchers roadshow trucks on and more researchers who participated in my Communicating your Research workshop have come up with succinct ways of describing their science or research.

Apologies to those in Palmerston North, I left your workshop exercises in Wellington while I was home briefly so will post them on my return. See below for the presentation slides from the workshop.

My favourite 10 from the session at AUT North Shore campus:

When Jaws screened, people viewed the sea in a different way. I’m exploring the Jaws effect of outdoor accidents on outdoor education.

Don’t you just wish you could always enjoy healthy food with none of the dryness or yuck flavour? We work on getting just the good stuff out of the fruit and vegetables to put into good-tasting food.

If my job defines me and I earn 10 times less than my expatriate colleague, am I 10 times less valuable than them? If so, how can we ever be friends?

Boundaries of flesh, boundaries of cloth, boundaries of space. We are what we wear, or are we?

I think, so I am existing! So, think how you are going to think!

Space is always political.

Marine reserves are not zoos, so why do tourists  get free passes?

A simple evacuation plan can be ‘run like heck!’. But how do we deal with half a million people running out of Auckland if one of its 49  volcanoes erupts?

A fish living in a rockpool is exposed to a 1 in 100 year hot day at low tide. How much heat can it take before it has to evolve or die?

Yeast is important for beer. It also helps solving beer-induced problems.

And a sample of the rest…

* If a person suffers a stroke and loses function in their arm, what is the best way to restore some of that function? We are developing a system to investigate this with the aid of robotics.

* With respect to the prevalence of chronic disease in children, we need to encourage them to be more active not by focusing on physical activity only, but also by interrupting sedentary behaviours.

* Using clinical tests to diagnose shoulder pain is like trying to fit hundreds of jigsaw pieces into a picture. These results will reduce the number of pieces, improving chances of completing the picture in a shorter time.

* Like our preference for ice cream flavours, our preference and tolerance for different sounds and loudness levels is unique to individuals. Some sounds, like ice cream can be restorative, but it is certain that both affect our physiology and not necessarily for the good.

* If a human is working closely with a robotic system, you need to make sure that his arm doesn’t get ripped off. This research project is about developing new motor systems that provide the safety features necessary.

* What is a university if you can still get a degree via online learning from the comfort of your home?

* Food is something we eat to survive. Functional food research gives you healthy, nutritious and tasty foods for all to enjoy!

* Making the most of the goodness of fruits and vegetables without the ‘yuck’ factor.

* New Zealand history talks about an egalitarian ‘better Britain’. But how does this founding ideology affect modern service delivery in hospitality?

* Pacific Islanders are often disadvantaged in terms of health outcomes and social services. Our study finds evidence to support positive changes for these people.

* Crystals are exquisite, but the most beautiful thing about a  protein crystal is that it gives us the opportunity to see in minute detail how it works, and how a drug might help or hinder it.

* Fish are great sources of food. But how are neurotoxins within them causing harm to humans?

* Can you be a vegetarian,  live in cold waters and be just like any other fish in the neighbourhood?