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If you are a blogger writer or science communicator, you should seriously consider checking out the upcoming Writing Science event being held at the Michael King Writers’ Centre in Auckland in October.

I’ll be there and the programme looks pretty impressive.

What’s the workshop about? The following quote from the workshop promotional material pretty much sums it up:

“..There is increasing concern about the conflation of water security, food security and energy security against the backdrop of global population increase to at least 9 billion by 2050, climate change and rising incidences of non-communicable disease… Science is essential to addressing these components of the ‘perfect storm’…The issue of public engagement and understanding is already a challenge and will grow.”

Professor Sir Peter Gluckman, Chief Science Advisor, Transition To Sustainability Conference, University of Auckland, 2010.

Sir Peter was tapping the same vein at the recent Transit of Venus forum in Gisborne where he called for better science communication to address that exact “perfect storm” he mentions above.

When it comes to science writing there are few short workshops that let busy professionals drop in to get some guidance on science writing – Dave Armstrong leads an excellent course at Victoria University that’s spread over three weekends – I’ve been a guest speaker the last couple of years and love watching Dave lead the class.

The Michael King Writer’s Centre course is more conference than workshop. It will really appeal to people working in and around science who want to take their writing to the next level, get ideas from established science writers like Rebecca Priestley, michael Corbalis and Geoff Chapple and figure out the lay of the land in terms of outlets and opportunities for science writing.

The centre is calling for applications with places limited to 24:

The workshop is limited to 24 applicants.  Writers applying to attend the workshop should have some publishing record or be specialists in their field. Participants will have published articles in journals, magazines or websites, and some will have published chapters in books or have books published or in progress. Those attending may be scientists, historians of science and medicine, natural history and technical writers, science journalists, Te Ara/Encyclopedia writers, writers covering public health and environmental issues, those currently writing in the science field and crossover published writers who have recently started writing about science.

Applications should be made to the address below by 15th July 2012 and include a writing CV.  Registration forms will be sent to those accepted by 30th July 2012  Payment is due following acceptance and may be made in two installments.