A psychic faces a room of skeptics

By Peter Griffin 09/09/2013 16


You have to give Sue Nicholson credit. The self-proclaimed “international psychic medium” may be greeted with legions of fans interested in getting “answers from the other side” when she kicks off her national tour at $58 a ticket this weekend.

Psychic Susan Nicholson

Psychic Susan Nicholson

But when she entered a lecture theatre at Victoria University last weekend to close day one of the New Zealand Skeptics’ Society annual conference, she was walking into the lion’s den – and she knew it.

Listen to Susan Nicholson’s talk at the 2013 NZ Skeptics Conference: 

[audio: http://archive.org/download/SusanNicholson/Susan Nicholson.mp3]

“I was told by many people not to come here. And I said ‘why not?”

“I believe in healthy discussion, and we all have our opinions and that’s great. I’m not here to prove anything. I’m not here to convince you. We all have our thoughts, we all have our ideas and that’s how the world goes around.”

And with that confident start, Nicholson delved back into her past, to growing up in England, her first vision of a dead person aged four, her sister’s near death experience which Sue sensed, the hide and seek games where she was able to “see” where everyone was hiding, a lonely childhood where the other children thought her a bit strange.

“I didn’t come out of this spiritual closet for some time,” said Nicholson, describing run-ins with family and the Church as people refused to accept her claims to possess psychic powers and turned away from her.

“My brother and sister don’t have anything to do with me, whatsoever.”

If Nicholson had carried on in this vein, explaining the downside of having amazing powers of observation, she may had won some sympathy – in the same way we show compassion for someone losing their mind to dementia.

But after about 15 minutes of talking Nicholson abruptly stopped and opened up for questions. Bad move. The gathered skeptics wanted technical details and were ready with questions that teased out the, to put it politely, pseudoscientific views Nicholson holds.  It wasn’t long before the positive energy in the room, which Sue picked up before starting her talk, drained from Rutherford House entirely.

The following exchange characterises the discussion that followed:

Skeptic: You could humiliate us skeptics by accepting one of our challenges and demonstrating that actually you do have these powers. Would you agree to be tested?

Nicholson: How about showing me what you skeptics can do? Why can’t we have someone who is a skeptic go and do the test? I might do it I might not. The thing is, I don’t have to prove myself to anyone.

Nicholson, despite her second sight, didn’t seem to understand she was in a room full of people who view the world through a filter of scientific evidence. If you can’t show us the evidence to back up your claims you have lost the argument. The fact she has worked on 14 criminal cases as part of the Sensing Murder TV show and can’t prove a single case was solved thanks to her input, didn’t seem to need any explaining.

It got wackier as Nicholson went on, culminating in her urging us to visit Egypt (but not right now), so we could see for ourselves that human beings could not possibly have constructed the pyramids.

It was all fairly civil and entertaining, but also very sad. In the pub afterwards we discussed whether Nicholson actually believes what she is peddling. Most of the gathered skeptics thought that she was indeed genuine in her beliefs, delusional as they are.

Given her lack of interest in answering her critics I can only come to the same conclusion. This isn’t a psychic who has studied the skeptics’ arguments, looked for loopholes, rehearsed the canned responses when confronted with the overwhelming evidence against her.

At one stage a skeptic asked a very good question Nicholson also had no response to: “I am bi-polar. I hear voices. How am I any different to you?”

Nicholson doesn’t have any answers and doesn’t care. She has nothing to prove. Her success is measured in how many bookings she gets for house blessings, the number of email counseling sessions she has lined up and how many seats she sells on her national tour. It isn’t measured by how many cases she solves, the successful cold readings she does or the number of skeptics she humiliates.

If it was, this psychic would be out of business.


16 Responses to “A psychic faces a room of skeptics”

  • As you said, Nicholson’s success is in getting bookings, and publicity is what she thrives on. There is no credibility there for her and any other psychic and the harm they do proven, we’ve heard all their claims before many times and they still are wanting. Cold reading explains the ruse.

    The problem then is why was she asked, lending credence to the idea that she has something worthwhile to say and it is credible, to be taken seriously enough she’s invited. Much like the Police ‘Adviser’ to Sensing Murder, it made her look much more credible and bolstered her claims and skeptics look much less credible.

  • diaz,

    I disagree. By inviting her along and treating her politely it confronts the stereotypes that skeptics are intolerant and rude.
    And I doubt she’ll gain any positive publicity from it.

    I just wonder when those open minded psychics and homeopaths will invite a skeptic to speak at their conferences?
    (or are psychic conferences done via remote viewing?)

  • Yes, I knew about it too – from the news.
    If she can provide verifiable evidence that she announced ahead of time where and when the earthquake was I’d be impressed. Announcing after it has happened suggests either delusion or callousness.

  • $250.00 internet reading,she told me my dad was with her- I thought that strange given that hes not dead and lives in Auckland. Said my mother misses me terribly and cries about me all the time. Mum is a partner in our business and sees and talks to me almost everyday.
    She didn’t have a clue who I was or what I did in this life but said I was a fireman a teacher and all kinds of wonderful things in previous lives. Yeah right! Plenty of other stuff but not anything worth hearing

  • I am sues cousin and along with the rest of the family have made a page called ‘justice for the bagleys’ as we want all her fans to see what a liar sue really is, what she has wrote in her book and what she has said happened to her as a child is beyond belief , what she fails to realise is we are not going to stop untill she is finally caught out .

  • Hello sue! I love to watch your program sensing murder and i think you should go fiji and solve a mistery murder of three young sister’s in Rakiraki, fiji island how they dissappeared.??

  • If a psychic can figure out so much detail about the victims, including name, dates, places they lived, places they died. Then why not be able to say who exactly the murders are, where they live, birthrate. Blah blah. Fyi: I’m not a skeptic or a believer but I can be skeptical and also keep open mind. These are reasonable questions

  • the “skeptics” need to get a life. I simply cannot believe such a “society” exists — as I don’t see the point….Everyone has the right to believe in what they want. Thing is, skeptics push their WAY on everyone else, and let me tell you what? Live and let life. Stop trying to push your views on everyone else. These are just negative people putting out negative energy. I agree with Sue that she has nothing to prove to anyone…and that is really a good attitude to have in life.

    • Cindy, would you like to explain how “skeptics push their WAY on everyone else”? Sue agreed to go to a skeptics conference, it wasn’t as if skeptics invaded a psychics conference.
      In telling us what to do and think you are doing exactly what you accuse skeptics of doing, so a little self reflection might be something for you to consider.

    • You’re right Cindy, Susan has, quite literally, nothing, and doesn’t need to prove it.

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