Guest Work

Hearing voices is more common than you might think

Guest Work Oct 23, 2016

By John Read, University of East London Hearing voices that other people can’t is a meaningful experience. Like dreams, they can usually be understood in terms of one’s life experiences. Within mental health services, however, the prevailing medical model means some practitioners pay attention only to their presence, not their meaning. Psychiatry’s diagnostic bibles, the American DSM-5 … Read More

Seaweed could hold the key to cutting methane emissions from cow burps

Guest Work Oct 17, 2016

By Michael Battaglia, CSIRO When Canadian farmer Joe Dorgan noticed about 11 years ago that cattle in a paddock by the sea were more productive than his other cows, he didn’t just rediscover an Ancient Greek and Icelandic practice. While the Ancient Greeks didn’t have to contend with global warming, it turns out that this practice could … Read More


Want to pimp your immune system? Take a holiday

Guest Work Oct 13, 2016

By Fulvio D’Acquisto, Queen Mary University of London Going on holiday, having a fun night out with friends, or simply relaxing at home with a good book – these activities make us feel good. Now, for the first time, we have evidence that they also do us good. Our latest study shows that our surroundings and lifestyle can have … Read More

It’s not just the ‘yuck factor’ that puts people off eating insects

Guest Work Oct 10, 2016

By Jonas House, University of Sheffield There’s a lot of hype around edible insects. Insects are being championed as a healthy and sustainable alternative to conventional protein sources in Europe and the US, and “ento-prising” new products are appearing almost every week. Cricket-based cocktail bitters, anyone? Of course, these new bug-based foods aren’t for everyone. In … Read More

Manuka honey may help prevent life-threatening urinary infections

Guest Work Sep 28, 2016

By Simon Hendel, The Conversation. Manuka honey could prevent serious urinary tract infections caused by catheters – tubes used to drain patients’ bladders, new laboratory research has found.  The research showed honey from New Zealand’s manuka plant slows the speed of bacterial growth and formation of biofilms, which are thin layers that build up on surfaces and harbour infection. Read More

Invasive predators are eating the world’s animals to extinction – and the worst is close to home

Guest Work Sep 25, 2016

By Tim Doherty, Research Fellow, Deakin University; Chris Dickman, Professor in Terrestrial Ecology, University of Sydney; Dale Nimmo, Lecturer in Ecology, Charles Sturt University, and Euan Ritchie, Senior Lecturer in Ecology, Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life & Environmental Sciences, Deakin University Invasive species are a threat to wildlife across the … Read More


Homo economicus: Why do we keep swallowing the Kool Aid?

Guest Work Sep 23, 2016

This is the final post in the three-part guest series from the Morgan Foundation’s Jess Berentson-Shaw and Geoff Simmons exploring the legacy of the myth of the rational human – Homo economicus. In our previous post we looked at how Homo economicus thinking ignores so much of what we know about human behaviour, especially in relation to public … Read More


Homo economicus: Public Health

Guest Work Sep 22, 2016

This guest post from the Morgan Foundation’s Jess Berentson-Shaw and Geoff Simmons is the second in a series of three exploring the legacy of the myth of the rational human – Homo economicus. As outlined in our first post , it’s time to ditch the myth of rational humans – homo economicus. The trouble is that many economists haven’t … Read More


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