SciBlogs

Fast-spreading killers: How Ebola compares with other diseases Guest Work Nov 12

By Mick Roberts, Massey University The West African outbreak of Ebola has claimed more than 4,800 lives and this number is sure to rise. There is understandably a lot of fear about Ebola, but how does it actually compare with other fast-spreading infectious diseases? Bubonic plague Plagues have been reported since biblical times, but it [...]

The Evolution of Superbugs Guest Work Sep 23

SciBlogs is running guest posts from some of the Eureka! Sir Paul Callaghan Awards 2014 finalists. In this guest post, Siska Falconer from  Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu tackles the science behind superbugs. Scientist predict that antibiotics will be ineffective in less than 10 years.  Imagine ten years on with no antibiotics for infections, [...]

The sexism of the circus Guest Work Sep 22

Earlier this month, I went to see Cirque du Soleil’s Totem show, currently doing a month’s run in Auckland on its way around the world. It was, as ever, an amazing show, but one act really disappointed me. Not due to a lack of skill or amazement, but purely because of the way it depicted scientists.

In this particular act, there is a scientist and a scientist’s assistant. Sounds good. However, fulfilling all stereotypes, the scientist was….that’s right, a grey-haired man (played by a young man, as we saw when he removed his wig at the end of the act). The assistant was, you guessed it, a young female.

Quantum computing and New Zealand Guest Work Sep 15

SciBlogs is running guest posts from some of the Eureka! Sir Paul Callaghan Awards 2014 finalists. In this guest post, Jack Wynne, from St. Patrick’s College Wellington explores the potential of quantum computing . In my presentation at the Sir Paul Callahan Eureka symposium I will discuss how advanced research into quantum mechanics could revolutionise New [...]

Antioxidants and the strange case of free radicals Guest Work Sep 12

SciBlogs is running guest posts from some of the Eureka! Sir Paul Callaghan Awards 2014 finalists. In this guest post,Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu student Joel Falconer weighs up antioxidants and free radicals. The use of antioxidants to combat free radicals is a controversial subject, particularly regarding the use of supplements to supply them, [...]

We should probably talk about nuclear power Guest Work Sep 09

SciBlogs is running guest posts from some of the Eureka! Sir Paul Callaghan Awards 2014 finalists. In this guest post, University of Auckland student Rachael Wiltshire kicks off a conversation about the future of New Zealand energy. Three years ago, my History class was studying the Vietnam War when a question arose: why would anyone want [...]

Making cancer history Guest Work Sep 08

SciBlogs is running guest posts from some of the Eureka! Sir Paul Callaghan Awards 2014 finalists. First up, University of Waikato engineering student Shalini Guleria shares her vision for the future of cancer therapy. The Statistics Each year approximately 7.6 million people die from cancer worldwide, this disease has one of the highest mortality rates [...]

Lead pollution beat Amundsen and Scott to the South Pole by 20 years Guest Work Jul 31

By Joe McConnell, Desert Research Institute We know elements of the story. It was 1911, as Robert Scott and Roald Amundsen raced to the South Pole. Temperatures were below -50˚C. Scott was British; Amundsen a Norwegian. Sled dogs were dying, and the explorers suffered from frostbite. The stakes were high, with financing of future explorations [...]

Moa bones reveal DNA half-life but Jurassic Park remains fiction Guest Work Jul 02

By Michael Bunce, Curtin University and Morten Erik Allentoft, University of Copenhagen [Originally published in October 2012 and republished here following Labour MP Trevor Mallard's desire to see the Moa resurrected] Moa birds disappeared from New Zealand following the arrival of human settlers in the 13th century, but their fossils now provide us with a [...]

GM techniques: from the field to the laboratory (and back again) Guest Work Jun 23

By Peter Langridge, Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics Welcome to GM in Australia [Ed: See Grant Jacob's three part series on GM in New Zealand here], a series looking at the facts, ethics, regulations and research into genetically modified crops. In this first instalment, Peter Langridge describes two GM techniques: selective breeding and genetic [...]

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