Guest Work

Manuka honey may help prevent life-threatening urinary infections

Guest Work Sep 28, 2016

By Simon Hendel, The Conversation. Manuka honey could prevent serious urinary tract infections caused by catheters – tubes used to drain patients’ bladders, new laboratory research has found.  The research showed honey from New Zealand’s manuka plant slows the speed of bacterial growth and formation of biofilms, which are thin layers that build up on surfaces and harbour infection. Read More

Invasive predators are eating the world’s animals to extinction – and the worst is close to home

Guest Work Sep 25, 2016

By Tim Doherty, Research Fellow, Deakin University; Chris Dickman, Professor in Terrestrial Ecology, University of Sydney; Dale Nimmo, Lecturer in Ecology, Charles Sturt University, and Euan Ritchie, Senior Lecturer in Ecology, Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life & Environmental Sciences, Deakin University Invasive species are a threat to wildlife across the … Read More

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Homo economicus: Why do we keep swallowing the Kool Aid?

Guest Work Sep 23, 2016

This is the final post in the three-part guest series from the Morgan Foundation’s Jess Berentson-Shaw and Geoff Simmons exploring the legacy of the myth of the rational human – Homo economicus. In our previous post we looked at how Homo economicus thinking ignores so much of what we know about human behaviour, especially in relation to public … Read More

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Homo economicus: Public Health

Guest Work Sep 22, 2016

This guest post from the Morgan Foundation’s Jess Berentson-Shaw and Geoff Simmons is the second in a series of three exploring the legacy of the myth of the rational human – Homo economicus. As outlined in our first post , it’s time to ditch the myth of rational humans – homo economicus. The trouble is that many economists haven’t … Read More

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Humans can make rockfalls from earthquakes more dangerous

Guest Work Sep 18, 2016

Mark Quigley, University of Melbourne and Josh Borella, University of Canterbury Earthquakes (including the tsunamis they generate) are Earth’s most fatal natural hazard, accounting for approximately 55% of the more than 1.35 million disaster deaths in the last two decades. The US Geological Survey predicts that more than 2.5 million people will die from … Read More

Explainer: how to prepare for a tsunami

Guest Work Sep 17, 2016

Jane Cunneen, Curtin University The recent magnitude 7.1 earthquake and subsequent tsunami warning in northern New Zealand reminds us that tsunamis are unpredictable and can strike any time. If you live in a tsunami risk zone then you’re probably aware of what to do when a tsunami strikes. But if you’re a traveller or a visitor from … Read More

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Pacific pariah: how Australia’s love of coal has left it out in the diplomatic cold

Guest Work Sep 09, 2016

Wesley Morgan, The University of the South Pacific Australia’s Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will have some explaining to do when he attends the Pacific Islands Forum leaders’ meeting in Pohnpei, Micronesia, this week. Australia’s continued determination to dig up coal, while refusing to dig deep to tackle climate change, has put it increasingly at odds with world … Read More

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Manuka honey makes bacteria less resistant to antibiotics

Guest Work Sep 08, 2016

Rowena Jenkins, Cardiff Metropolitan University Manuka honey has been a firm favourite on health food shop shelves for several years now, but has long been used as a natural remedy by the indigenous Maori people of New Zealand. The dark, sticky nectar is known as the “healing honey” for a reason: it has antiviral and antibacterial properties … Read More

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