Guest Work

Murky waters: why is Japan still whaling in the Southern Ocean?

Guest Work Jan 23, 2017

By Indi Hodgson-Johnston, University of Tasmania Photographs allegedly showing Japanese whaling operations in the Southern Ocean emerged this week. Coinciding with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to Australia, critics have called for greater action from the Australian government on the issue. Japan has stated that, despite various resolutions at the International Whaling Commission and criticism … Read More

Photos: Creatures reveal true colours up close

Guest Work Jan 23, 2017

From a tiny caddsifly to a frolicking dusky dolohin, NIWA staff have captured some beautiful images of insects, birds, fish – and a particularly handsome frog. These up close and personal images have required enormous patience, great skills and a little bit of luck to pull off. They have all been taken by NIWA scientists and staff in the course … Read More

‘Smart robots’ and the law

Guest Work Jan 22, 2017

By Associate Professor Colin Gavaghan, Director of the New Zealand Law Foundation Centre for Law and Policy in Emerging Technologies, University of Otago The European Parliament’s Draft Report on Robotics has certainly captured the public imagination, and it’s easy to see why. Proposals about ‘smart robots,’ ‘robot killswitches’ and ‘electronic persons’ perfectly capture the zeitgeist, where talk of … Read More

Diabetes screening test important for New Zealand

Guest Work Jan 18, 2017

New research calls into question a test used to identify diabetes risk. But we shouldn’t throw out the baby with bathwater, warn Prof Jim Mann and Dr Paul Dury. An Oxford University study and accompanying editorial, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), have raised  questions regarding the most  appropriate approach to prevent or delay  the onset of … Read More

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The “Great Acceleration” is cause for great concern.

Guest Work Jan 18, 2017

By Prof Ralph E H Sims, Massey University, Palmerston North The future for secure and peaceful human life on our planet is under threat. A wide range of socio-economic indicators that illustrate global growth parameters from 1750 to 2010 confirm the rapid acceleration that has become particularly evident over the past six decades as world population … Read More

Life’s a beach: NZ scientists on their favourite beaches

Guest Work Jan 16, 2017

Many Kiwis have a favourite seaside spot they escape to in the summer and scientists are no exception. In this NIWA Summer Series article, six scientists reveal their summer getaway beaches and reflect on how these holiday hotspots are changing. Dr Ken Grange, Regional Manager, Nelson. Dr Ken Grange. Credit: NIWA. Beach: Rarawa Beach, east coast Far North How long have you been … Read More

Five things to consider when designing a policy to measure research impact

Guest Work Jan 13, 2017

By Andrew Gunn, University of Leeds and Michael Mintrom, Monash University.  This year will see the Australian government pilot new ways to measure the impact of university research. As recommended by the Watt Review, the Engagement and Impact Assessment will encourage universities to ensure academic research produces wider economic and social benefits. This fits into … Read More

Why are most people right handed? The answer may be in the mouths of our ancestors

Guest Work Jan 12, 2017

By Caroline Spry, La Trobe University Roughly 90% of humans are right-handed and this is one of the traits that separates us from most other primates who don’t really show any overall preference for left or right handedness. It’s believed that handedness played an important role in human evolution, with a recent study on the earliest evidence … Read More

GM crops and herbicides: time to reassess risk assessment methods

Guest Work Jan 11, 2017

by Professor Jack Heinemann New studies published by Nature’s journal Scientific Reports are questioning the basis of how to determine the safety of products used in agriculture and at home. The first of these featured reports is on the application of ‘omics’ techniques to a long familiar GM maize line called NK603. The second featured report is on the … Read More

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