Guest Work

Life’s a beach: NZ scientists on their favourite beaches

Guest Work Jan 16, 2017

Many Kiwis have a favourite seaside spot they escape to in the summer and scientists are no exception. In this NIWA Summer Series article, six scientists reveal their summer getaway beaches and reflect on how these holiday hotspots are changing. Dr Ken Grange, Regional Manager, Nelson. Dr Ken Grange. Credit: NIWA. Beach: Rarawa Beach, east coast Far North How long have you been … Read More

Five things to consider when designing a policy to measure research impact

Guest Work Jan 13, 2017

By Andrew Gunn, University of Leeds and Michael Mintrom, Monash University.  This year will see the Australian government pilot new ways to measure the impact of university research. As recommended by the Watt Review, the Engagement and Impact Assessment will encourage universities to ensure academic research produces wider economic and social benefits. This fits into … Read More

Why are most people right handed? The answer may be in the mouths of our ancestors

Guest Work Jan 12, 2017

By Caroline Spry, La Trobe University Roughly 90% of humans are right-handed and this is one of the traits that separates us from most other primates who don’t really show any overall preference for left or right handedness. It’s believed that handedness played an important role in human evolution, with a recent study on the earliest evidence … Read More

GM crops and herbicides: time to reassess risk assessment methods

Guest Work Jan 11, 2017

by Professor Jack Heinemann New studies published by Nature’s journal Scientific Reports are questioning the basis of how to determine the safety of products used in agriculture and at home. The first of these featured reports is on the application of ‘omics’ techniques to a long familiar GM maize line called NK603. The second featured report is on the … Read More

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Go native: why we need ‘wildlife allotments’ to bring species back to the ‘burbs

Guest Work Jan 11, 2017

By Lizzy Lowe, University of Auckland and Margaret Stanley, University of Auckland As urban populations around the globe skyrocket and the demand for housing grows, space is increasingly at a premium in cities. Unfortunately, despite some notable efforts to include green space in cities, native wildlife is not often a priority for urban planners, despite research … Read More

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Weird Science: We believe anything was ‘art’ if we are told it is art

Guest Work Jan 01, 2017

French artist-provocateur Marcel Duchamp may have been on to something when he displayed a commercially-manufactured urinal signed by ‘R. Mutt’ as ‘art’ in his famous 1917 work ‘Fountain’, if a Dutch study published in September is anything to go by. The scientists say that just believing something is ‘art’ can completely change the way we perceive and respond … Read More

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