News

Ketamine & depression: NZ part of world-first clinical trial

John Kerr Aug 16, 2016

New Zealand patients will be part of the world’s largest controlled clinical trial testing the “enormous potential” of ketamine as an antidepressant medication. A vial of ketamine. Credit: Wikimedia / Psychonaught Depending on who you ask, the drug ketamine is either a powerful anesthetic, a horse tranquilizer or an illicit narcotic.  However, there is now a growing … Read More

3

Olympic Rivalries: Battle of the same-sexes

Julie Iles Aug 12, 2016

This Olympic season Michael Phelps has been unmatched as the most decorated Olympian of all time, though there has still been media scrutiny surrounding his ‘glaring’ rivalry with Chad le Clos of South Africa. Professor J Benenson of Harvard University Rivalries like Phelps and le Clos’ have been making a splash at Rio, and close attention has been paid to how athletes … Read More

NZ native falcon is actually two types of bird

John Kerr Aug 10, 2016

The New Zealand falcon, or kārearea, population is actually made up of two different subspecies, scientists have decided. Researchers from Massey University declare the subspecies split in a new study analysing the physical and genetic differences between kārearea from different parts of the New Zealand. The research is published in IBIS, International Journal of Avian Science. In collecting data on bird sizes, the researchers … Read More

6

The Paleo diet and diabetes: evidence lacking

John Kerr Aug 08, 2016

An Australian researcher has spoken out against a growing number of claims that the Paleo diet – consisting largely of low-carbohydrate food – can help to manage or even reverse diabetes. Writing in the Medical Journal of Australia, Associate Professor Sof Andrikopoulos from the University of Melbourne says despite dozens of websites urging people with diabetes to go … Read More

Captain Cook’s Chooks

Guest Work Aug 05, 2016

by Julie Iles New Zealand’s first chickens probably hitched a ride here on Captain James Cook’s ship Resolution, new research has found. Radiocarbon dating of the chicken bones revealed an overlap between the bone and James Cook’s second voyage to New Zealand during 1773-1774. The bones were sourced from three Maori midden sites, or refuse heaps, along the east coast … Read More

Honeybee decline could sting NZ for $700m

John Kerr Aug 03, 2016

The pollinating power of the humble honeybee is worth millions of dollars to the New Zealand agricultural sector – but we are at risk of losing it. Bees are having a hard time of it these days; varroa mite, pesticides and a lack of plant diversity are all contributing to the decline of the bee populations crucial for pollinating crops. Read More

1

Tiny bird refutes ancient NZ drowning

John Kerr Aug 01, 2016

A tiny native bird has challenged the theory that New Zealand’s ancient land mass was completely submerged millions of years ago. DNA analysis of New Zealand wrens, just published in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, has untangled the birds’ family history as well as a larger mystery around the very origins of New Zealand. The research from the University of Adelaide focused … Read More

2 2

Paying tribute to a science reporting star

Peter Griffin Jul 29, 2016

RNZ’s Veronika Meduna, one of the country’s most experienced and respected science journalists, finished up co-hosting the popular Our Changing World show last week. After 17 years at the broadcaster, most spent producing and fronting science and environment stories for Our Changing World, it wasn’t her choice to go. Frozen budgets at RNZ and restructuring to achieve audience … Read More

5 2

World needs to ‘get serious’ about exercise

John Kerr Jul 28, 2016

The world needs to lift its game when it comes to exercise, warn public health researchers, saying we face a “global pandemic” of physical inactivity. The call comes as part of Special Series published today in leading medical journal The Lancet. The authors of the Series warn there has been too little progress in tackling the global pandemic of physical inactivity, … Read More

Samoa obesity-gene link not so simple

John Kerr Jul 26, 2016

High rates of obesity in Samoa have been linked to a particular version of a gene which is prevalent among the island’s population. However, relying on the often repeated formula of ‘gene X’ causes ‘condition Y’ risks oversimplification, say experts. The results, published today in Nature Genetics, were based on an analysis of DNA samples and basic health data collected from … Read More

Site Meter