News

Predator free NZ: Can we do it?

John Kerr Jul 26, 2016

The New Zealand Government has just unveiled ‘the world’s most ambitious conservation project’: eliminating introduced predators such as rats, possums and stoats by 2050. But is it a realistic goal? The Prime Minister John Key announced the target yesterday , starting off with with a new $28 million joint venture, Predator Free New Zealand Limited, which will sponsor community partnerships and pest … Read More

16 2

Environment NZ’s weak point for UN goals

John Kerr Jul 22, 2016

New Zealand gets a few ‘Fs’ in a new report card examining how we are doing on the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals. In September last year New Zealand, along with 192 other countries, signed up to the goals, which described by the UN as “a bold and ambitious global plan to end poverty, address inequalities and tackle climate change.” There are … Read More

Govt asks: ‘Conservation science – are we doing it right?’

John Kerr Jul 18, 2016

The Government funds millions of dollars’ worth of conservation and environment research each year – and it needs your help to make sure that research is heading in the right direction. A planned conservation and environment science ‘roadmap’ will lay out the Government’s research priorities of for the next 20 years. The Department of Conservation (DOC) and Ministry for the Environment (MfE) have jointly … Read More

1

Nail-biting thumb-suckers less prone to allergies

John Kerr Jul 12, 2016

Children who engage in thumb-sucking and nail-biting are more likely to grow up to be free of some allergies, according to new research from the long-running Dunedin Study. The world-famous study has followed a cohort of over a thousand children born in Dunedin in the early 1970’s, allowing unprecedented insights into what makes us into who we are (and is currently … Read More

Scientists scope out suitable habitats for New Zealand sea lions

Erica Mather Jul 02, 2016

A recent study identifies promising new breeding sites on the Otago Peninsula and the Catlins coast for New Zealand sea lions. Researchers have prioritised the identification and protection of potential breeding habitats for recolonisation along the South Island coast. The subantarctic islands are home to the only three breeding colonies of the New Zealand sea lion (Phocarctos hookeri, … Read More

The consensus on coffee and cancer

Erica Mather Jun 22, 2016

There is no conclusive evidence that drinking coffee causes cancer, but experts report that drinking very hot beverages ‘probably’ causes cancer of the oesophagus. The specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization (WHO) – the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), held a press call last week where they released the results of a thorough investigation of the … Read More

1

Be careful who you trade with – New Zealand’s biosecurity threat vectors

Erica Mather Jun 17, 2016

There is an increased likelihood that invasive species arrive in New Zealand from countries with poor regulation and low political stability, according to research published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Research released this week from Victoria University of Wellington reveals that a country’s level of governance and development has a strong impact on their risk of exporting exotic … Read More

9

Southern NZ lakes congested with algal snot

Erica Mather Jun 10, 2016

Three iconic South Island lakes – Wanaka, Coleridge and Wakatipu, are being clogged with a particular type of algae that produces floating mucous or ‘lake snot’. The alga called Cyclotella, or recently renamed by algologists as Lindavia intermedia, is related to the ‘rock snot’ alga didymo. The recent appearance of lake snot is associated with the emergence and dominance … Read More

3 1

NZ scientists join ambitious search of the cosmos

Erica Mather Jun 08, 2016

Scientists from the University of Auckland have signed up to join the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) project, one of the most ambitious astronomy projects ever undertaken. The LSST is a purpose-built telescope equipped with the world’s largest digital camera at 3,200-megapixels, which is able to take snapshots of the night sky the size of 40 full moons. The … Read More

1 1

Newly identified magma chamber explains Bay of Plenty earthquakes

Erica Mather Jun 07, 2016

A combination of satellite images, GPS data and survey information from the 1950s have enabled scientists to uncover a magma chamber under the Bay of Plenty coast, which they link to thousands of small earthquakes here between 2004 and 2011. Until this finding, published in Science Advances, the reason for the earthquake ‘swarm’ was thought to be tectonic. Now … Read More

Site Meter