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Posts Tagged religion

New group challenging the anti-science brigade Ken Perrott Jun 29

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Here’s a recent press release from a new group, The Society for Science Based Healthcare, which is having some successes in challenging anti-scientific advertising.


ASA2s

Controversial Church Caught Red Handed

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) upheld three complaints from the newly formed Society for Science Based Healthcare today regarding misleading health claims.

The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, DailyDo and Pure Wellbeing have all been asked by the ASA to remove adverts that make misleading health claims.

The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, which was recently embroiled in controversy regarding claims that its holy oil could heal a variety of serious health problems, has had a second complaint upheld against it. Bishop Victor Silva, when responding to a previous successful ASA complaint, had promised that:

“When we come to hold another similar event, we will take external advice as to the content of any promotional material to doubly ensure that it is fully compliant with all regulation and that there is no chance of another complaint of this nature.”

Despite these assurances, within 3 weeks of this promise the church sent out another advertisement for a “chain of prayer” series of events. This advert claimed that “IT WORKS!” and that a “HEALING” session covered cases such as “When doctors & medicines are not enough” and “incurable diseases”. A majority of the complaints board agreed that “the Advertiser had presented their religious beliefs in evangelical healing as an absolute fact, rather than opinion, and may mislead and deceive vulnerable people who may be suffering from any of the illnesses listed in the advertisement”. The board ruled to uphold the complaint.

DailyDo, a daily deals website, advertised amber teething necklaces with phrases such as “Traditional homeopathic treatment for teething babies, designed to help provide relief”. As the advertiser was unable to provide any evidence to support their claims, the ASA ruled that “the advertisement was misleading and had not been prepared with the high standard of social responsibility required for products with intended therapeutic use”.

This is the latest in a long series of successful complaints regarding misleading health claims about amber beads, which resulted in a new ANZA guideline being written. In response to the complaint, the ASA has sent a copy of this guideline to other “one day deal” sites.

A number of advertisers of these products, such as Baa Baa Beads, have had complaints upheld against them but have refused to remove their misleading claims. Now that the Fair Trading Act has been recently updated to prohibit unsubstantiated claims in trade, the Society for Science Based Healthcare hopes that the Commerce Commission will step in to put a stop to claims such as these. The Society intends to file a complaint with the Commerce Commission against companies that continue to make these misleading claims.

The Pure Wellbeing website advertised Detox Foot Patches, claiming that they could remove “toxins” and heavy metals “By stimulating the reflexology points and the blood circulation”. Because the advertiser failed to provide any evidence that the claims they were making were true, the complaints board ruled that the advertisement was misleading and must therefore be removed, upholding the complaint made against it.

There were also two settled complaints from the Society for Science Based Healthcare, against a homeopathy advert by Ngaio Health and a colour therapy advert by Colour Therapy Manukau. Both companies had claimed that they were able to treat serious health conditions such as cancer, but did not substantiate these claims. In both cases the company agreed to remove the claims.

The Society for Science Based Healthcare welcomes these decisions, and hopes that the advertisers involved will take them to heart and refrain from making misleading health claims in the future. These are the latest in a long line of complaints about misinformation regarding healthcare, and as there is still plenty of misinformation out there you can expect to hear more from the Society in the future.


About the Society for Science Based Healthcare

The Society for Science Based Healthcare is a newly formed consumer advocacy group that aims to protect consumers’ rights to make informed healthcare decisions. Although the society itself is new, over the past 2 years its founders have lodged over 50 successful complaints with the ASA regarding misleading health claims, dealing with products and services ranging from chiropractic and acupuncture to magnetic mattress underlays and a quantum magnetic health analyser.

Mission statement

“We believe that a strong basis in rigorous science is a necessary prerequisite for providing safe and effective healthcare. Decisions regarding public funding of healthcare in New Zealand should therefore be science based. We support public health measures that have a clear basis in science and evidence, and oppose those that do not.
We will work to counter misinformation about health issues propagated by individuals and organisations in New Zealand.
Consumers have the right to make an informed decision about their healthcare, and should not have to worry about being misled by unsubstantiated claims.”

Relevant links

Society for Science Based Healthcare – http://sbh.org.nz
Advertising Standards Authority – http://www.asa.co.nz
Universal Church of the Kingdom of God – http://www.uckg.co.nz/
DailyDo – http://www.dailydo.co.nz/
Pure Wellbeing – http://www.purewellbeing.co.nz/

Upheld Complaints:
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14219
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14205
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14250

Settled Complaints:
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14266
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14290

Similar articles

New group challenging the anti-science brigade Ken Perrott Jun 29

No Comments

Here’s a recent press release from a new group, The Society for Science Based Healthcare, which is having some successes in challenging anti-scientific advertising.


ASA2s

Controversial Church Caught Red Handed

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) upheld three complaints from the newly formed Society for Science Based Healthcare today regarding misleading health claims.

The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, DailyDo and Pure Wellbeing have all been asked by the ASA to remove adverts that make misleading health claims.

The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, which was recently embroiled in controversy regarding claims that its holy oil could heal a variety of serious health problems, has had a second complaint upheld against it. Bishop Victor Silva, when responding to a previous successful ASA complaint, had promised that:

“When we come to hold another similar event, we will take external advice as to the content of any promotional material to doubly ensure that it is fully compliant with all regulation and that there is no chance of another complaint of this nature.”

Despite these assurances, within 3 weeks of this promise the church sent out another advertisement for a “chain of prayer” series of events. This advert claimed that “IT WORKS!” and that a “HEALING” session covered cases such as “When doctors & medicines are not enough” and “incurable diseases”. A majority of the complaints board agreed that “the Advertiser had presented their religious beliefs in evangelical healing as an absolute fact, rather than opinion, and may mislead and deceive vulnerable people who may be suffering from any of the illnesses listed in the advertisement”. The board ruled to uphold the complaint.

DailyDo, a daily deals website, advertised amber teething necklaces with phrases such as “Traditional homeopathic treatment for teething babies, designed to help provide relief”. As the advertiser was unable to provide any evidence to support their claims, the ASA ruled that “the advertisement was misleading and had not been prepared with the high standard of social responsibility required for products with intended therapeutic use”.

This is the latest in a long series of successful complaints regarding misleading health claims about amber beads, which resulted in a new ANZA guideline being written. In response to the complaint, the ASA has sent a copy of this guideline to other “one day deal” sites.

A number of advertisers of these products, such as Baa Baa Beads, have had complaints upheld against them but have refused to remove their misleading claims. Now that the Fair Trading Act has been recently updated to prohibit unsubstantiated claims in trade, the Society for Science Based Healthcare hopes that the Commerce Commission will step in to put a stop to claims such as these. The Society intends to file a complaint with the Commerce Commission against companies that continue to make these misleading claims.

The Pure Wellbeing website advertised Detox Foot Patches, claiming that they could remove “toxins” and heavy metals “By stimulating the reflexology points and the blood circulation”. Because the advertiser failed to provide any evidence that the claims they were making were true, the complaints board ruled that the advertisement was misleading and must therefore be removed, upholding the complaint made against it.

There were also two settled complaints from the Society for Science Based Healthcare, against a homeopathy advert by Ngaio Health and a colour therapy advert by Colour Therapy Manukau. Both companies had claimed that they were able to treat serious health conditions such as cancer, but did not substantiate these claims. In both cases the company agreed to remove the claims.

The Society for Science Based Healthcare welcomes these decisions, and hopes that the advertisers involved will take them to heart and refrain from making misleading health claims in the future. These are the latest in a long line of complaints about misinformation regarding healthcare, and as there is still plenty of misinformation out there you can expect to hear more from the Society in the future.


About the Society for Science Based Healthcare

The Society for Science Based Healthcare is a newly formed consumer advocacy group that aims to protect consumers’ rights to make informed healthcare decisions. Although the society itself is new, over the past 2 years its founders have lodged over 50 successful complaints with the ASA regarding misleading health claims, dealing with products and services ranging from chiropractic and acupuncture to magnetic mattress underlays and a quantum magnetic health analyser.

Mission statement

“We believe that a strong basis in rigorous science is a necessary prerequisite for providing safe and effective healthcare. Decisions regarding public funding of healthcare in New Zealand should therefore be science based. We support public health measures that have a clear basis in science and evidence, and oppose those that do not.
We will work to counter misinformation about health issues propagated by individuals and organisations in New Zealand.
Consumers have the right to make an informed decision about their healthcare, and should not have to worry about being misled by unsubstantiated claims.”

Relevant links

Society for Science Based Healthcare – http://sbh.org.nz
Advertising Standards Authority – http://www.asa.co.nz
Universal Church of the Kingdom of God – http://www.uckg.co.nz/
DailyDo – http://www.dailydo.co.nz/
Pure Wellbeing – http://www.purewellbeing.co.nz/

Upheld Complaints:
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14219
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14205
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14250

Settled Complaints:
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14266
http://asa.co.nz/display.php?ascb_number=14290

Similar articles

A healthy attitude towards quantum mechanics Ken Perrott Jun 19

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Credit: xkcd.

Apparently the above quote “You can safely ignore any sentence that includes the phrase’ according to quantum mechanics” is used by Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharf  in their upcoming book The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty.

Good advice.

A healthy attitude towards quantum mechanics Ken Perrott Jun 19

No Comments

Credit: xkcd.

Apparently the above quote “You can safely ignore any sentence that includes the phrase’ according to quantum mechanics” is used by Robert P. Crease and Alfred Scharf  in their upcoming book The Quantum Moment: How Planck, Bohr, Einstein, and Heisenberg Taught Us to Love Uncertainty.

Good advice.

An outdated tax anomaly – charitable status of relgion Ken Perrott Apr 13

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Here is a New Zealand Kickstarter project well worth supporting – a film which sets out to answer the questions:

  • Why do religions pay few taxes?
  • Why do companies owned by religions also avoid tax?
  • With more non-believers than ever – is this fair?

Pennies from Heaven – A Documentary about religion and tax. by Toby Ricketts — Kickstarter.

The tax-free and rates-free  charitable status of religions in this day and age is an anomaly which will eventually need resolving.  As the proposal says:

Despite this huge rise in the number of non-believers and increased focus on the importance of separation of church and state, most ‘secular’ governments continue to subsidise religious organisations; providing them with broad tax immunity (including any companies or corporations that they own), local rates exemptions and other entitlements. While the public expectation is that all religions are behaving as charities in the traditional sense (working to relieve poverty and advance the public good, etc.), the reality is that some churches are behaving more like corporations; stockpiling cash and buying external investments (putting aside for the moment the mansions, sports cars and diamond rings sported by bishops and ministers). The result of this tax break for the religious is that there is less money for education, healthcare, conservation and other core state functions that would benefit a nation as a whole.”

The problem is highlighted in this report - Religious financial privileges in New Zealand.

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What makes something right or wrong? Ken Perrott Mar 20

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Here is another of the  4 animated videos produced by the British Humanist Association. They are all narrated by Stephen Fry.

This one deals with aspects of morality – an important subject where the voice of non-theists is often ignored.

“What makes something right or wrong?” Narrated by Stephen Fry 

See: That’s Humanism: Four animated videos about Humanism narrated by Stephen Fry

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How do we know what is true? Ken Perrott Mar 19

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The British Humanist Association has produced 4 animated videos explaining humanist ideas. They are all narrated by Stephen Fry

Here is one that particularly appealed to me - “How do we know what is true?.

See: That’s Humanism: Four animated videos about Humanism narrated by Stephen Fry

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Terry Pratchett making sense Ken Perrott Mar 06

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photo TP

Another god debate Ken Perrott Feb 23

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GodAndCosmology_Slider

Apparently Sean Carroll and William Lane Craig went head to head this weekend on the question of “the existence of God in light of contemporary cosmology.”

Usually I think these sort of debates are a waste of time but am keen to see the video of this one – it will be on Youtube eventually. In previous debates Craig attempts to use cosmology to “prove” the existence of his god (I use the word “use” as meaning very opportunist use of motivated reasoning). In most debates his opponents are usually not completely familiar with modern cosmology and he gets away with murder in his misrepresentation of the science.

But Sean Carroll is a different proposition. Not only is Sean a researcher and teacher in cosmology he is also an excellent communicator of science. His recent bookThe Particle at the End of the Universe, won last year’s Royal Society Winton Prize for best science book (see The particle at the end of the universe’ wins Winton Prize).

Carroll

Nor is he intimidated by Craig’s acknowledged debating skills. He says in a blog post before the debate:

“You can find some of WLC’s thoughts on the upcoming event at his Reasonable Faith website. One important correction I would make to what you will read there: Craig and his interlocutor Kevin Harris interpret my statement that “my goal here is not to win the debate” as a strategy to avoid dealing with WLC’s arguments, or as “a way to lower expectations.” Neither is remotely true. I want to make the case for naturalism, and to do that it’s obviously necessary to counter any objections that get raised. Moreover, I think that expectations (for me) should be set ridiculously high. The case I hope to make for naturalism will be so impressively, mind-bogglingly, breathtakingly strong that it should be nearly impossible for any reasonable person to hear it and not be immediately convinced. Honestly, I’ll be disappointed if there are any theists left in the audience once the whole thing is over.”

I think his tongue was in his cheek with the last sentence.

His suggestion for viewers:

“Feel free to organize viewing parties, celebrations, discussion groups, what have you. There should definitely be a drinking game involved (it’ll be happy hour on the West Coast, you lightweights), but I’ll leave the details to you. Suggested starting points: drink every time WLC uses a syllogism, or every time I show an equation. But be sure to have something to eat, first.”

Thanks to God and Cosmology Debate with W.L. Craig

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Determining scientific knowledge by petition Ken Perrott Jan 27

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Some readers may be familiar with the “Scientific Dissent from Darwinism” petition organised by the Discovery Institute. It’s a classic example of trying to decide science by petition. The petition still gets trundled out by creationists attempting to “prove’ that the acceptance of evolutionary science is weak in the scientific community – or that many “brilliant” scientists oppose Darwin’s ideas.

Six years ago I did my own brief analysis of signatories to the petition specifically to check their scientific credentials (see Who are the “dissenters from Darwinism”?). I really only looked at a sample (those with the first name Steve, and the three from New Zealand).

The other day in my surfing I came across another analysis of these signatories at Rational Wiki (see A Scientific Dissent From Darwinism). This appears to have attempted to check the credentials of everyone on the list. It is worth having a browse to get an idea of what motivates these people..

By the way, I came across a new term I have not heard before - Wingnut welfare.

It is worth doing this sort of analysis when you come across similar petitions – the are common with those wanting to deny the current scientific consensus on an issue. Petitions like this have been produced by climate change deniers and opponents of fluoridation.

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