Any questions?

By David Winter 03/07/2013 7


This blog is very much for you, the reader.

We’ve been really pleased with the reaction to our opening few posts, and especially happy that readers have asked us questions about the project. I’ve forwarded those questions on to the people that can best answer them, and hope to dedicate a post to those answers next week. There is still time for more. If there is something you’ve always wanted to know about tuatara, some aspect of genetics or genomics you’ve never quite understood or if one of our opening posts left you wondering about something let us know. You can comment on this post, use the contact form to send a message privately or tweet to us at @tuataragenome, however you send your question we’ll do our best to have an expert provide you an answer.


7 Responses to “Any questions?”

  • here’s one, I thought about it for all the recent “de-extinction” discussions about various species but having a live one might help…

    What about epigenetic markers? How important are these when considering if all the genomic information has been captured? Should we get to the point of creating artificial sequences for organisms larger than microbes will we need to concern ourselves with these?

  • Good question Darcy,

    If you don’t mind, I might split into two sub-questions for answers.

    (a) How much information does the genome sequence itself give us, and will understanding epigenetic tags (and other data on top of the genome sequence) be important?

    (b) How useful is a genome sequence going to be in any attempt at “de-extinction” (or for tutatra, conservation)?

    That way I can get expert answers for each (warning: expert for the last one might be me 🙂

    • Go for it Grant. I’d considered asking your for the answer – but reckon it’s better to cast the net a little wider than sciblogs’ own contributors 🙂

  • Just so you know, part of the reason is that I have considered writing a series looking at genome structure & epigenetics, with a non-specialist audience in mind – it might not be a bad point to try start from. (I’ve written a couple of posts on a few aspects of epigenetics earlier.)

    Besides, the longish answer I’d already written looked long enough to be better placed as a blog post!

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