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Posts Tagged Development

Right…a way to crunch a business model from good research ideas Peter Kerr Jun 17

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Here’s an interesting innovation move, one to be applauded.

It’s Startup Weekend Science and Research, in Wellington at Creative HQ from Friday July 3 to Sunday 5.

Interesting because its the first time a non-digital (as such) Startup Weekend event’s been done in NZ (France has beaten us to the draw). Most startup weekends like this are around apps or web-based functions – something that requires developers and designers.

This 54-hour marathon though has tangible products, something physical you can touch as the start point. It is open to all research-based ideas (the criteria for this is at the end of the blog).

SWRsch is to be applauded because it is:

  1. Delving into the unknown – the organisers aren’t quite sure how many people will attend
  2. Likely to lever off some of our country’s other strengths, be they our biological, manufacturing or other service industry areas of expertise
  3. (People still have to eat, move, experience, live and play in the real, physical world. Solving problems in these areas is just as important as in the online space)

It is also a good intiative because it potentially combines the ethos of startup weekends: speed to market, pace of (software) development, minimum viable product and the like; with what will often be a protectable intellectual property position from the research.

Finally, it could be quite exciting to see teams looking to develop deep technology on the Friday night, and frantically looking for someone such as a chemist or electrical engineer or food technologist, rather than desperately trying to find a coder/programmer.

The organisers are really wanting to attact PhD students – people with ideas, people who don’t necessarily want an academic/researcher role in their next career phase – to be part of the weekend.

To state the obvious, getting them along, en mass as a way of acquiring a range of skills over and above what they’ve learned doing their doctorate, is going to be the trick.

Here’s what the weekend organisers are looking for.

What is a research-based idea?

  • To be a good fit for #SWRsch your idea should meet (or come close to) the following criteria:
  • It will be based on a defined body of research e.g. a masters/doctorate project, market research, socio-economic research, data project, etc
  • It will require a degree of research and development to be a marketable product i.e. it is not already at the product stage (you may or may not have done a portion of this R&D already)
  • It will not have been widely commercialised yet i.e. you may have explored one market but think there is more potential to be realised yet

At last…an innovation accelerator aimed at physical products Peter Kerr Jun 11

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Right, something you can get your teeth into…literally – Lightning Lab Manufacturing.

So, instead of a 12 week accelerator to figure out how to take a digital idea out to the world, the same sort of programme but aimed at a physical product.

Great.

As I’ve commented before, we risk missing out on, and leveraging off the biological resource and manufacturing ideas that we (well hopefully) have abounding in our country. Heck, it could even be making and doing something better with the proverbial Number 8 wire! Obviously we need to move beyond commodities (as Fonterra’s milk powder based payout implodes), and these sort of events will encourage just that.

LL/M is now calling for applications from people who have prototypes, or even just an idea for a physical product, and who are prepared to spend three months validating and building their business model before pitching it to investors at a special Demo Day in November.

Like the digitally-oriented LLs, there will be intensive mentoring, networking and business upskilling – but this time for hardware rather than software.

Applications are due on June 26, though as an introductory evening at Wellington’s Creative HQ indicated on Tuesday 9 June, there could be a wee bit of flexibility around that deadline. This is especially so given that another non-digital initiative, Startup Weekend Science and Research is taking place in the capital beginning on July 3 (more on that in another blog).

Of interesting note for LL/M is the move to Wellington by Austin, Texas-based Shawn O’Keefe. He’s been the producer of SXSW Interactive for 14 years, and takes on the Programme Director role. O’Keefe’s bringing his young family over as well – which is obviously not something you do on a whim.

And, as O’Keefe said in introducing himself to us on Tuesday, “let’s make – we have no excuses anymore.” He’s particularly referring to 3D printing, hardware hacking, biometric sensors and the internet of things – among many things.

One point he made is that applicants don’t necessarily have to have a team around them (yet), nor a prototype.

An idea from a individual can then have those elements built around them.

There’s only going to be eight startups selected, from anywhere around the country.

If you get in, in return for 6% equity, teams receive $15,000 in startup financing, and $5,000 research funding from Callaghan Innovation…plus the pitch to investors in November.

Hopefully LL/M is swamped with applications. The organisers are agnostic about where in New Zealand these are from – the only priviso being that teams are prepared to work out of a (probably High Street) lab in Lower Hutt.

I’ll be interested to see how it pans out from a who can actually afford to be there point of view. The digital LL is mostly made up of young, single people – who have much more ability to live off the smell of an oily rag.

I’m guessing here, but suspect that physical product ideas are more likely to be from more mature people, often with families. Taking 12 weeks out of your life on minimal pay may simply be beyond do-able for many of these potential applicants.

Let’s hope I’m wrong on that.

Application forms, which can be filled out in draft form, then returned to for updating and submitting, are at: lightninglab.co.nz/manufacturing

Go on, take a bite out of it.


Do Kiwis have a certain je ne sais quoi with regard to Startup Weekends – or is that wishful thinking? Peter Kerr May 05

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Having been lucky enough to be around a couple of startup things in the past few weeks – I’ll take the opportunity to reflect.

The first occasion was a Skype interview at Wellington’s Creative HQ with George Smith, the founder of Glass Jar, an app that helps make group payments (such as in a flat) easier. Glass Jar was one of Lightning Lab’s accelerator graduates from last year.

They successfully pitched at LL’s Demo Day, and then relocated the USA.

George and his teammates spent three months doing the meet and greet with would-be investors in America, and then were accepted into Y Combinator, a Silicon Valley seed investment accelerator.

One of the interesting comments from George was that investors didn’t think much of the Glass Jar idea for the USA (flatmates over there have a completely different way of looking after shared bills).

But they did like the Kiwi team, and it was this that was backed at Y Combinator – which could be likened to being a Lightning Lab on steroids, where the participants are more worldly in a business-sense than some of the participants you see in New Zealand.

Nick Churchouse, the head of customer engagement at CreativeHQ made a passing comment that he quite often hears, and hears of this comment from USA investors. Mind you, given the courage it would take to relocate yourself to the States to pursue an unknown future, and given the can do attitude these coders, designers and entrepreneurs would display, it shouldn’t surprise us.

It is perhaps related to the apocryphal stories you sometimes hear of New Zealanders (often engineers), leading teams in overseas locations. For example, my brother leads the ground team of the International Space Station and helps look after oxygen, waste and water. (Like me, he’s a Southland farm boy by upbringing, with no engineering training as such, but with the ability to keep a team of brainiacs on task with a minimum of fuss).

Then again, all countries, all peoples are going to feel they’re special in this way.

However, as we continue the Startup Weekend business training exercises, our designers, developers and puller-togethers’ ability to work together could be viewed as a specific Kiwi trait, something that should be encouraged, a way to move beyond our sometimes too-self-effacing attitude.

Or perhaps that’s trying to put a gloss on something that can only happen by luck and circumstance.

What does anyone else think?


Name change signals expanded ability for patent owners to leverage their IP Peter Kerr Oct 01

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A name’s an important clue to how a company represents itself to the world.

So, the change to IP Nexus from IP Exchange represents a business and philosophical change for the Hong Kong based but globally oriented company.

Its founder and CEO Hidero (Hidi) Niioka got hold of sticK to remind New Zealand SME owners of the marketplace which aims to connect patent owners with others looking for the solutions the patents’ offer.

The Nexus (rather than Exchange) term seems appropriate for an organisations that’s grown considerably since first mentioned in stick in June 2012. (One definition of nexus is a connection or series of connections linking two or more things).

For startups, inventors, universities, SMEs and other entrepreneurs looking to use their IP beyond New Zealand’s shores, the continuing development of IP Nexus offers considerable advantages says Hidi.

Part of this built on three (new) pillars, compared to IP Exchange.

  • Ask an expert – post questions and get expert answers for free

  • Services marketplace – post jobs nad gets experts’ bids

  • Directory – search for specific technical or regional expertise worldwide

Hidi points out that while the NZ government (and many others around the world) promotes innovation, accelerator platforms and the like, there is a need to make related advice and services more accessible for those launching new ventures, especially those who are looking outside their home markets.

The goal of our new services is to make it easier for inventors, startups and other small businesses to develop their ventures and protect and monetise their IP,” says Hidi.

Signing up is free, so if you are just looking for basis advice, it won’t cost you anything. On the other hand, if you need specialised technical or cross-border expertise, you connect easily to the relevant professionals through a simple search.”

IP Nexus’ experts are able to answer some questions for free, and prices for services are negotiable beyond that. It has over 200 IP experts onboard representing a broad base of global and technical expertise from New Zealand and Australia, to Silicon Valley, Europe, Japan and China. It also has over 61,000 patents and other IP available for search.

Under the company’s model, patent owners can upload as many patents as they want for free for marketing to potential commercialisation agents such as IP brokers, law firms and interested technology companies.

Patent owners only pay a success fee of 4-12% is there successful sale or licence of the patent.

As is often pointed out about NZ patent holders, Kiwi businesses often completely ignore the option of selling or licensing patents overseas.

Given that most NZ inventions will also be applicable in other countries, IP Nexus is an idea worth exploring while protecting the patent. Check it out at ipnexus.com


Name change signals expanded ability for patent owners to leverage their IP Peter Kerr Oct 01

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A name’s an important clue to how a company represents itself to the world.

So, the change to IP Nexus from IP Exchange represents a business and philosophical change for the Hong Kong based but globally oriented company.

Its founder and CEO Hidero (Hidi) Niioka got hold of sticK to remind New Zealand SME owners of the marketplace which aims to connect patent owners with others looking for the solutions the patents’ offer.

The Nexus (rather than Exchange) term seems appropriate for an organisations that’s grown considerably since first mentioned in stick in June 2012. (One definition of nexus is a connection or series of connections linking two or more things).

For startups, inventors, universities, SMEs and other entrepreneurs looking to use their IP beyond New Zealand’s shores, the continuing development of IP Nexus offers considerable advantages says Hidi.

Part of this built on three (new) pillars, compared to IP Exchange.

  • Ask an expert – post questions and get expert answers for free

  • Services marketplace – post jobs nad gets experts’ bids

  • Directory – search for specific technical or regional expertise worldwide

Hidi points out that while the NZ government (and many others around the world) promotes innovation, accelerator platforms and the like, there is a need to make related advice and services more accessible for those launching new ventures, especially those who are looking outside their home markets.

The goal of our new services is to make it easier for inventors, startups and other small businesses to develop their ventures and protect and monetise their IP,” says Hidi.

Signing up is free, so if you are just looking for basis advice, it won’t cost you anything. On the other hand, if you need specialised technical or cross-border expertise, you connect easily to the relevant professionals through a simple search.”

IP Nexus’ experts are able to answer some questions for free, and prices for services are negotiable beyond that. It has over 200 IP experts onboard representing a broad base of global and technical expertise from New Zealand and Australia, to Silicon Valley, Europe, Japan and China. It also has over 61,000 patents and other IP available for search.

Under the company’s model, patent owners can upload as many patents as they want for free for marketing to potential commercialisation agents such as IP brokers, law firms and interested technology companies.

Patent owners only pay a success fee of 4-12% is there successful sale or licence of the patent.

As is often pointed out about NZ patent holders, Kiwi businesses often completely ignore the option of selling or licensing patents overseas.

Given that most NZ inventions will also be applicable in other countries, IP Nexus is an idea worth exploring while protecting the patent. Check it out at ipnexus.com


Lightning Lab II grows up – will its offspring make it to adolescence? Peter Kerr Jun 03

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Anyone that’s been around young children will appreciate there’s a heck of a difference between a one year old and a two year old.

A similar comparison is valid with Lightning Lab II, which last week had nine of its 10 starters from three months ago pitch to about 250 would-be investors, and a number of others who mostly filled Te Papa’s main theatre last Wednesday.

As LL itself says, it is modeling the way it works off TechStars and other USA originated accelerator initiatives.

But there’s a New Zealandness to how it is done.

So, as well as the added degree of presentation polish, one of the more notable aspects was, apart from three business asking for just under $500k each, the other six businesses were relatively low in how much money they were asking for.

This partly reflects there’s still more market validation and proof required, and also the New Zealand environment.

Often overseas startup accelerator businesses have already obtained some money (from friends, family and fools) before they begin the three month intensive mentoring and ‘is there a business here’ questioning process.

New Zealand accelerator startups at this LL tend to be less mature, and the degree of realism in the money pitch in bringing new investors onboard was one of the features this time round.

Naturally, since many of the pitches are as much about selling the sizzle as the sausage, there is a touch of scepticism required in the growth projections put forward.

But, without any due diligence, all the pitches sounded like they could – with the right combination of expertise, clear direction and luck – gear themselves up to grow.

And, rather than attempting to break down each businesses’ prospects myself, I’ll repeat Nicolai Thomson’s speculation. Nicolai, (Twitter handle, @nicolaithomson) is the founder of Lendyour.co.nz. Here are some of his, and some of his colleagues’ thoughts about the business propositions put forward at LL Demo Day.

He raises some interesting points, that investors too will no doubt explore as they look under the hood of these potential part-purchases.

In Nicolai’s words:

I don’t rate Twingl’s business model though I would totally use their product. They need to look at alternative monetisation and in the last 18 months I’ve heard their CEO twice and don’t rate his ability to spot a future trend, change and win fast enough when established companies jump on their un-patented mapping.

MishGuru, too reliant on Snapchat being a fad today, and limited audience using it. Snapchat will pass and be dead in 3 years. Their subscription plan is also fundamentally wrong as their target market is enterprise paying $10 a month. Every company will start on that level with little incentive to move to more expensive plans which would assure MishGuru can pay their bills.

Floc has a great concept but little future. Using Telco data is not going to be given to a brand new team with no reputation, and would be revoked the moment a controversial CEO or diplomat was tracked leaving their building after someone eyeballed then and identified their dot after hacking in to Floc systems. Never-mind the fact restaurants have legal obligations when it comes to employment and cancelling shifts before or on the day won’t fly for long in the name of saving the owner some dollars. Staff would likely leave and cause unnecessary headaches.

Coach Seek will be a safe bet, no spectacular exit so ideal for the risk averse of those investing. I like the product though maybe a touch too expensive starting at $49USD a month.

Cloud Cannon were my top pick, followed by CommonLedger.

CommonLedger will have a competition issue and will probably be best to position themselves to be bought out quickly. They will be overtaken by deeper pockets if their concept starts to take off. Their CEO gave the impression they are going to build a global giant and may miss a good return which some investors could be spooked by.

Cloud Cannon though probably have the closest disruptive product but I spoke to a designer friend last night and there are major concerns with SEO ability if you get quite messy code that it would deliver the site through. There is no comparison to original source code being indexed. This service cuts out the core web developers who provide the framework/CMS which is why WordPress has been so popular. If they can get SEO to be great, then it’s a winner. Again, won’t take long for others with resources to reverse engineer. Great business model though.

What I didn’t see from any of the teams though is a disruptive produce that carves out a niche which cannot simply be reversed engineered, or copied by teams with deeper pockets, more experience and crucially an existing customer base to test, and get faster feedback from. There were a couple of self-proclaimed engineers and maths geeks, however no one stated their competitive advantage was an algorithm that is one of the few things not easily replicated.

 

 

 


Lightning Lab grows up, gets into its groove Peter Kerr Apr 30

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The Lightning Lab’s demo day had some quite fascinating works in progress…bring on Demo (to investors) Day on May 28 at Te Papa.

The team behind LL are also, as you’d hope, a year wiser, further along a path with the aim of rapidly ramping up verified/proven businesses.

It also isn’t surprising to see the LL accelerator (now there’s a nice rhyme/assonance) expanding to Auckland next year and Christchurch.

The nine, mostly two or three man teams (and a question asked why so few females?), have had assumptions challenged, hard questions posed – as teams are forced to think about building a business as opposed to creating a product.

There is also wider value beyond the incubation itself, as Ken Erskine, director of startups at The Icehouse, (as appears in Stuff), puts it perfectly

He says research showed successful startup accelerators provided a network of highly experienced and committed mentors and investors, an active alumni network and, most importanly, connections to future capital.

Together, we have a phenomenal combined network of mentors, investors and startup entrepreneurs to help ensure the success of the nationwide accelerator programme.”

At the demo, with a small d, day on April 23, one of the three month intensive’s more interesting pivots was the horse guy.

The original pitch was to do something to make horse shoeing more easy. But the team lead by Ashok is now looking to create a tool so that businesses can run campaigns on SnapChat (the instant appear/disappear photo app).

The guys looking to build a tool to automate translating accounting figures from say Xero, MYOB or QuickBooks to an accountant’s own chart of accounts has already got strong traction and demand.

One of the startups wants to capture, retain and effectively distribute that deep institutional knowledge longertime employees have about a company and how it works.

There’s an app to help the hospitality industry manage its staff/flow requirements, and software for managing shared expenses – as in flatmate situations. An easy, no-bugs way to get a web design quickly going live and updateable, a water tank monitor device, management software for sports coaches, and an app that uses social networks as a way to connect offline – say a quick game of tennis – were explained, and a brief lessons learned given by all.

Finally, and this will be interesting to see if they can get it right – a map that shows where you’ve been on web searches – a way of collecting notes and creating shortcuts through the world’s knowledge.

So, obviously no shortage of ideas up for grabs.

But, as we all know, ideas are easy – it is getting them to sustain flight that’s the trick.

And, an interesting final note:- LL is a partnership between founding investor partners (who receive a percentage share of any startup’s initial offer) and MBIE, part of its accelerator funding pool.


‘Fire engine envy’ + time = sales Peter Kerr Apr 01

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Fire engine envy.

No, I never knew that such a condition existed, though it kinda makes sense if you happen to be involved in the fire fighting business.

But fire engine envy is one of many factors that’s assisted Lower Hutt’s Fraser Engineering into a pre-eminent position as an Australasian manufacturer of such tenders.

Speaking at a recent gathering of Technology Valley participants (and totally coincidentally, held at Petone’s Fireman’s Arms pub), Fraser’s general manager Martin Simpson told of how firemen looking enviously at the units put together by his own company, make comments that gradually and ever so slowly filter up to positively influence decisions made by a purchasing officer.

Fraser’s manufacture virtually everything in a fire engine tender beyond an imported truck chassis and cab (though they’re thinking about building this as well).

It starts with feedback and input from real firemen.

Hosereels, pumps, valves, nozzles, cabinents and the whole kit and caboddle are designed from scratch, from single components up, on a SolidWorks 3D CAD software platform.

Most of them are then created through the use of more than $20 million of manufacturing equipment, including an increasing amount of 3D (additive) metal and other products printing.

The demands of fire fighters are an important element in designing extremely robust equipment.

“A fireman’s pumped with adrenalin when they’re in action,” says Martin.

“They don’t want to be grabbing something in the heat of the moment…and it breaks. Likewise, a pump must start first time, every time.”

Another aspect of firemen psychology is that, during some of their downtime (mostly they’re not fighting fires), they’ll often surf the net, checking out tools of their trade. (You can imagine that this sort of exercise would certainly contriubte to fire engine envy!)

Martin says that unlike some of their competitors’ fire engines, all Frasers’ vehicles are immediately able to go into service (commissioning is relatively easy). The company also concentrates on the “whole of life cost” of the tenders, noting that Fraser’s has virtually zero warranty issues. In other words, the fire engines work first time, for a long time.

It is information and feedback such as this that slowly filters through the fire services of different states and countries – helping to build Fraser’s reputation.

Martin says Fraser’s is helping to organise a major fire fighting conference to take place in Wellington in September 2014, which may be attended by up to 2000 people.

“If there’s any other fire fighting related companies who would like to attend this event that will have every purchasing officer from Australia and New Zealand there, as well as a swag from other countries, we’ve love to hear from them,” he says.


A trial with zero percent success proves trap’s worth Peter Kerr Mar 18

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 Any business that gets itself into a financial position to employ others is, by default, doing OK.

If that operation starts with a completely new product, to survive long enough to (at least) thrive, is even better.

So it is great to hear of pest and predator control company Goodnature coming up trumps in an extensive DOC test in a two-year project at two trial sites at Boundary Stream Mainland Island, Hawkes Bay, and Onepu, Northern Te Urewera.

We’ve set a whole new standard for rat control with traps,” says Goodnature head of marketing and market development Stu Barr.

For us and DOC the trial results are exceptional and beyond the expectations set at the start of the project.

To put it in perspective, the pass mark for the trial was 5%. To get 0% at both trial sites has set a whole new standard for future developments. At 0% all the rats are gone and therefore all bird and native species vulnerable to rat predation are going to thrive and grow in numbers.”

This is a level of control previously only achieved by toxins.

Goodnature’s A24 automatic humane kill-traps for rats and stoats resets itself up to 24 times powered by a 16 gram compressed CO2 canister. A bolt to the animal’s head results in an instant kill.

The Goodnature A24 rat and stoat trap

And while the innovative design of the traps (which, in a larger version also kill possums) was part of the design team’s approach, over time the Wellington company’s found much of its ongoing research and development aimed at perfecting longlife lures to attract the pest to its death.

Stu Barr says the constant trap and lure improvement were vividly seen when the 2013 technology version traps were deployed in 2013.

The humane killing technology, along with pest-specific lures, is now being use in more than 15 countries around the world.

As well as further rat control, Goodnature’s automatic resetting traps are helping eliminate the introduced mongoose in Hawaii, and mink in Scandinavia.

All of this hasn’t happened overnight of course.

Goodnature, founded by three mature design students, started in 2006.

But there’s now eight people onboard – and you can only be an employer if you’re making money.

The constant trap and lure improvement is part of the company’s design philosophy.

The trial alongside DOC, and more importantly the 100% kill statistics all help Goodnature position itself as a viable est control method beyond poisons.

Undoubtedly too when Goodnature started, they considered themselves in the pest killing business. Over time they’ve found themselves just as much in the pest-attraction business – as the ‘kill’ part of the trap itself is increasingly honed to perfection.

It is this eye for constant improvement that is helping the company grow.

Good luck guys, keep up the good work.


Finding the fruitful intersection of ideas and organisation Peter Kerr Feb 18

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 Ultimately this blog is a plug for Stephen Cummings handbook of ways that business can fruitfully marry management and creativity.

Along the way it is also an endorsement of the Professor of Management at Victoria University’s Business School, and in particular the part he played in what was Industrial Research Ltd’s former Leadership Development Programme (LDP). (See page 5).

The LDP was essentially an MBA on steroids – condensing into a couple of weeks what often is a two year grind. Stephen was one of the LDP facilitators.

From (the former) IRL’s point of view, not only did the LDP expose and encourage  its researchers and staff into leadership roles, it was also a highly productive and cost-effective way to encourage ideas that would be of benefit to IRL and its clients.

The LDP gave permission for ‘ordinary’ IRL people to grow, to literally think outside the square of what the former crown research institute could or should be.

As a result, the ‘What’s Your Problem New Zealand’ concept, of a million dollars of research for a commercial challenge that had major potential to impact, was born.

The ‘Scientist for a Day’ programme, opening the doors of Gracefield to the general public was another initiative. (Coastal Markers Ltd used the day to introduce themselves to the science capability on its doorstep).

Some of the thinking, outcomes and research behind the LDP is no doubt included in Stephen Cummings and Chris Bilton’s ‘Handbook of Management and Creativity’. (Check near the end of the blog and you’ll find a link to a discounted early-bird order).

I gave the challenge to Stephen to give a one sentence line as to: why AREN’T management and creativity diametrically opposed.

And inch being pretty close to a mile, this was his email reply.

“The Handbook is based on the idea that good management and creativity are similar: they both require the effective combination of disciplined focus and unstructured free-association. We tend to see management as the opposite of creativity, but this is largely for historical reasons. In the middle of the 20th history management’s fundamental aim was defined as the pursuit of efficiency. Part of this limited definition of intent was reference to pioneers like FW Taylor (so called creator of Scientific Management) who were claimed to be only focussed on efficiency. However, was is forgotten in management history is that Taylor’s ideas were destined for the scrapheap until a young lawyer called Louis Brandeis remodelled them and used them to attack big business interests in a high profile legal case in 1910. ‘Conservation’ was the big political issue of the day, as governments sought ways to combat rampant business  exploitation and Brandeis connected these new ides about management to show how business could more carefully and creatively utilize their resources and share their wealth. The aim of the ‘conservation movement’, of which Brandeis, Taylor and FD Roosevelt were a part, ascribed this thinking was “the greatest good for the greatest number for the longest time.” If history had been interpreted differently and we had come to see this more open guiding principle of management then we might not see management and creativity as opposites in the first place.”

And here’s the original email that earned Stephen his plug.

We are pleased to offer a special promotional price on The Handbook of Management and Creativity, a compilation of new research and case studies on the relationship between management and creativity (see the attached flyer). The book features experts from the fields of management studies, creative industries research, organisational studies and strategy. Further details can be seen via the weblink below (and extracts are available via Amazon’s ‘Look Inside’ option). Some of the research findings in the handbook are also discussed in a blog which you can find here

We are able to the handbook to our personal networks at a special discounted price of £40 (+p&p). The discount is available to individuals only (not for libraries or institutions) between now and the end of March.

To order please click http://bit.ly/19UUd7j or email sales@e-elgar.co.uk, quoting promotional code BILT40

Please take advantage of what we think is a pretty generous offer from the publishers and please provide any of your own comments and thoughts about management and creativity in general or the book in particular on the blog site. It would be great if you could contribute to the discussion. And please tweet/linkedin/pass on information about the book to any of your friends/colleagues/networks that you think might be interested.


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