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Posts Tagged Entrepreneur

Open for thinking, open for participation, open for collaboration Peter Kerr Apr 02

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The name of the two day Wellington conference on Thursday and Friday 16/17 April says it all.

Open Source//Open Society (OS//OS).

As a digital immigrant who has, without sometimes knowing why, gone down he android path for my devices, I’m inherently drawn to the open source philosophy.

In a sense, at a time when public participation in democracy is lessening, it is events such as this that continue to hold the flame for non-secrecy and more sharing in society.

It is the antidote to businesses that want us to purchase their own proprietary products – locking us in, holding us to metaphoric ransom.

And given that bits and bytes represent today’s key infrastructure, being open rather than closed around how computing’s coding source is used, by all, can be considered the epitome of democracy.

So I’ll be attending the very reasonably priced ($199) event, which is the first time the world’s largest repository of open source code, Github, has co-hosted a conference outside the United States.

This in itself is a real feather in the Wellington tech community’s collective hat – and for Enspiral and its fellow travellers Loomio and Chalkle who have helped to organise it.

OS//OS describes itself as a gathering of bright minds and communities from open technology, open government, open business and open education.

You can see this in some of its speaker’s topics, such as:

  • Is the Internet a tool for liberation or control?
  • What happens if we work together? What does a commons based future look like?
  • My Dream. “What if…”

At the same time, one of the major benefits of any event such as this is the ability to share, participate and collaborate.

It is an opportunity for peoples’ ideas to mate and spawn new ideas. Given OS//OS’s openness, I expect the “we could do this” discussions to be very savvy.

Finally, a note on the cute name the organisers have called the afternoon tea break on the first day.

As a message maker at Punchline.biz, it appeals as an encapsulating idea and ideal for OS//OS.

What is it called (and check it out in the event timetable here)?

Diversi-Tea!


Why a democratic open-source news and views site needs reinvention and why we should care Peter Kerr Feb 23

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Scoop’s in the middle of an attempt to change its ownership and business structure from individual shareholders to community (to be designed). It has just launched a PledgeMe crowd funding bid.

The metaphor that applies is not unlike the tragedy of the commons. The analogy is that we don’t know what we had until we haven’t got it.

First up, I have a vested interest in Scoop’s survival. This blog is re-blogged from Scoop among others, and I’ve done some work for it over the years.

Second, I am friends with Alastair Thompson its owner. That aside…

Now the ‘old’ models of monetizing news and content on the net no longer work.

Even gatherers, creators and gatekeepers of news, Fairfax and APN, are finding it challenging to make money online.

Scoop’s model has always been where any voice can be heard, a space/place for differing opinions, supported by banner advertising and other means.

That no longer works.

At the same time, like much that exists on the net we’ve got used to the idea of news being free (even if someone/thing has been paying for it).

From NZ Inc’s point of view Scoop is extremely important part of our news and content infrastructure – not only promoting democracy and debate – but curating it all too.

Imagine for a moment, not having its resource, its searchability, its information and knowledge on tap. It is data as democracy, democracy as an accessible right.

But, now Thompson and Scoop are making a leap into the great unknown.

He wants to reinvent Scoop as a sustainable and profitable publicly-owned and directed resource.

What this might be is to be decided.

That’s why stage one of Operation Chrysalis, is asking for $30,000 at least – to allow a three month breathing space, to collectively design that new structure in conjunction with its new stakeholders.

No one has ever tried this before; its pretty ballsy stuff.

From both an individual and collective point of view, not having Scoop would yank out a large part of our modern available knowledge.

Scoop needs to continue – everyone, from politicians to PR companies, news junkies to school projects, special interest groups to bloggers need it to thrive. (Not the least, it is useful and important for my Punchline message making consultancy.)

It will be an interesting metamorphosis.


A picture’s worth a thousand words…or not in our case Peter Kerr Dec 16

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I’m a sucker for a good diagram – a picture’s worth a thousand words and all that jazz.

So I thought I’d see what, if anything, came up in a search about New Zealand’s science and innovation system; diagram-wise.

The image below, taken as a screenshot, is what Google came up with when I searched under ‘science and innovation system, New Zealand’ (selecting the Google images icon as well)

S & I system NZ, Google images

Google screenshot, science and innovation system, New Zealand

To state the obvious – nothing terribly much here to explain what goes on in godzone, not a hint of a plan you’d have to say.

Well, what about a comparison with other countries?

So, I did the same for Denmark, a country that we like to compare ourselves to, frequently.

This is it here.

Google screenshot, science and innovation system, Denmark

Google screenshot, science and innovation system, Denmark

Again, to state the obvious – much more illustrative, many more models and examples of how Denmark’s ideas to products continuum hangs together.

What the heck, decided to do the same for Fiji (a near neighbour we’d possibly like to think we have a bit of a science and innovation lead over).

Here’s their Google search result.

Google screenshot, science and innovation system, Fiji

Google screenshot, science and innovation system, Fiji

Now, there may be some peculiarity in Google algorithm for my searches. (Though I had some of my non-sciencey colleagues search too, and they came up with something very similar).

And, it could be an unfair search term for NZ Inc

Or, it could be that there is no plan.

It could be that we’re doing lots of science, lots of innovation, lots of commercialisation – but it is all adhoc and uncoordinated, relying on luck and synchronicity and who the heck knows what.

I’m also hoping I’m wrong.

If anyone’s seen a plan, please point it out.

It would be a kind of relief to see one.


Bringing Biggs to the party an inspired move Peter Kerr Oct 29

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The appointment of Peter Biggs as inaugural chairman of the new Wellington Regional Economic Development Agency, is an inspired bargain.

I briefly dealt with ‘Biggsy’ as he is commonly known, in a former life.

My observation is that he’s great at doing deals and, even more importantly, making things happen.

That, in Wellington’s case as all and sundry circle but never get any traction around the idea that ‘we need to do something’, is why he will be great in this position.

As a colleague commented once, the job of a chairman is to get down and dirty and be fighting in the trenches.

Arguably, one of Biggs’ main attributes is this figurative hand-t0-hand combat skills that he possesses.

The former Wellingtonian of the Year (2003) is extremely well connected and networked at all levels across government and industry.

One of his mottos (according to one of his former colleagues), once a decision has been made is to “let’s pile into this guys”.

This is exactly what our city and wider province needs – essentially permission to execute something, and a bit of a blow-torch up everyones’ collective rears to make it happen.

As a motivator, a string-pullerer, loosener of wallets and most importantly of all, an enthusiast for a good idea that needs backing, having Peter Biggs onboard is fantastic.

So, welcome back from eight years in Melbourne Peter.

There’s plenty of things we could be doing here, plenty of ideas, some of them potentially big.

We look forward to you helping to kick them off in the new agency.

Collectively (adding to the WREDA’s four C’s – cohesion, confidence, conversion and communication) there’s a region that’s really behind you.

Note: WREDA’s so new, I couldn’t find an URL that directly relates to it. The closest is here.

Note: Feel free to also check out Punchline – Messages that Matter, my new business, based on a Secret SAUCE


Shanahan on a mission to destroy the notion of plucky NZ punching above its weight Peter Kerr Oct 24

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You have to give the effusive and self-effacing Greg Shanahan his due.

He kicked off the TIN 100 report in 2004, and now in its tenth year of production it reflects the healthy growth in New Zealand’s ICT, high-tech manufacturing and biotech sectors.

As Shanahan told a Wellington audience at MoBIE‘s new headquarters in Stout St, the combined revenue of these strongly value adding businesses is over $8.3 billion, with $6.1 billion of that from exports.

That’s more than our forestry industry, and provides pretty well-paying jobs for over 35,000 people.

And, as is fitting for a decade anniversary, Shanahan reflected on the growth in the TIN sector, the changes he’s observed and, more importantly, what he’d like to see in New Zealand’s attitude to our successful businesses.

“Part of the goal of the TIN 100 is to help us move past the idea of plucky New Zealand punching above its weight,” he says.

“That’s rubbish as an idea, a type of apology.”

“It’s a bit like saying, that Greg Shanahan, he’s not as bad as you thought.”

Greg Shanahan, TIN100, 22 Oct 2014

TIN 100 founder Greg Shanahan (“not as bad as you thought” [but see story for its context]}

A punching above your weight connotation is also rubbish since global competition demands that a company be a leader in its field. To maintain leadership, TIN 100 and TIN 100+ companies have been increasing R&D and sales and marketing effort as a proportion of their total revenue.

“By doing that, these companies are able to be price makers instead of price takers,” he says.

The summary of this year’s TIN 100 findings are:

  1. ICT growth remains strong
  2.  Recovery of the high-tech manufacturing sector
  3. Healthcare growth is strong
  4. The USA recovery continues

Shanahan says he continues to be bullish about the sector mainly because he feels New Zealand is the right size:

  • We’re small enough to be quick and large enough to be dangerous
  • We’re able to do things more quickly, more efficiently
  • Because we have poorer economies of scale [compared to other countries], we have to do things more efficiently

So, hats off to Shanahan and his team.

Without his sterling efforts we’d have no profile, no analysis and certainly very little celebration of these smart sectors.

(Note: if you’ve got this far, you also might like to check out my new site Punchline – messages that matter)


Of course nobody notices – there’s no photo opportunity! Peter Kerr Oct 07

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Naturally it has escaped the attention of mainstream media…

But, the fact is that two Kiwi IT companies are still in, and contributing to, the world’s largest IT project – the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope. (See a press release here).

Thousands of radio telescopes to be built in Southern Africa and Australia between 2018 and 2024 will monitor and survey space, producing vast amounts of data.

It will require real-time analysis of 120 terabytes per second – the equivalent of streaming one million high definition movies at once.

This is a massive Big Data project, and will require new developments in both hardware and software.

A team led by Open Parallel including Catalyst IT engineers has devised and delivered the initial version of the Software Development Plan for how participants in the project will develop software and/or firmware to achieve design goals established for the SKA.

Now, Open Parallel’s director, Oamaru-based (yes, you’ve read that correctly) Nicolas Erdody has also been the inspiration and driver behind three Multicore World conferences (now in its fourth consecutive edition – Feb 2015, Wellington). These assemblies of global IT heavyweights are looking how to take advantage of massive computing power available through multicore computers (where there’s many many processors on one chip).

So far no one has effectively cracked how to write the parallel programs (coding) that takes advantage of this power.

But, by being part of the SKA project, Open Parallel and Catalyst have positioned themselves to both learn, along with others, and ride the inevitable wave of parallel programming, big data, cloud and green computing, and many more state-of-the-art technologies.

So what?

Well, if it comes to pass, there will be a huge opportunity for New Zealand to be at the forefront of what will be a whole new basket of knowledge and technologies around multicore and programming for them.

The opportunities for our IT sector(s) to be ride this parallel computing wave will be immense – way bigger than the movie industry, with much more potential to branch into different fields.

Naturally, Erdody and Catalyst IT managing director Don Christie aren’t part of SKA solely as their contribution to knowledge about our universe.

But they are taking a longterm view, positioning their own companies to be part of the knowledge creation for the project, and clearly identifying themselves as clever and competent operators in an ever-expanding field.

It is doubtful that either of them have any clear idea of where their involvement will lead.

However, their leadership and vision will in the near future be of immense benefit to our country. After all, what computer programmer wouldn’t want to live in New Zealand to be part of both SKA and ongoing developments in multicore and parallel programming.

Not that the government or media would have a clue.

It’s not something that has a photo opportunity.

It also requires the ability to think.


Name change signals expanded ability for patent owners to leverage their IP Peter Kerr Oct 01

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A name’s an important clue to how a company represents itself to the world.

So, the change to IP Nexus from IP Exchange represents a business and philosophical change for the Hong Kong based but globally oriented company.

Its founder and CEO Hidero (Hidi) Niioka got hold of sticK to remind New Zealand SME owners of the marketplace which aims to connect patent owners with others looking for the solutions the patents’ offer.

The Nexus (rather than Exchange) term seems appropriate for an organisations that’s grown considerably since first mentioned in stick in June 2012. (One definition of nexus is a connection or series of connections linking two or more things).

For startups, inventors, universities, SMEs and other entrepreneurs looking to use their IP beyond New Zealand’s shores, the continuing development of IP Nexus offers considerable advantages says Hidi.

Part of this built on three (new) pillars, compared to IP Exchange.

  • Ask an expert – post questions and get expert answers for free

  • Services marketplace – post jobs nad gets experts’ bids

  • Directory – search for specific technical or regional expertise worldwide

Hidi points out that while the NZ government (and many others around the world) promotes innovation, accelerator platforms and the like, there is a need to make related advice and services more accessible for those launching new ventures, especially those who are looking outside their home markets.

The goal of our new services is to make it easier for inventors, startups and other small businesses to develop their ventures and protect and monetise their IP,” says Hidi.

Signing up is free, so if you are just looking for basis advice, it won’t cost you anything. On the other hand, if you need specialised technical or cross-border expertise, you connect easily to the relevant professionals through a simple search.”

IP Nexus’ experts are able to answer some questions for free, and prices for services are negotiable beyond that. It has over 200 IP experts onboard representing a broad base of global and technical expertise from New Zealand and Australia, to Silicon Valley, Europe, Japan and China. It also has over 61,000 patents and other IP available for search.

Under the company’s model, patent owners can upload as many patents as they want for free for marketing to potential commercialisation agents such as IP brokers, law firms and interested technology companies.

Patent owners only pay a success fee of 4-12% is there successful sale or licence of the patent.

As is often pointed out about NZ patent holders, Kiwi businesses often completely ignore the option of selling or licensing patents overseas.

Given that most NZ inventions will also be applicable in other countries, IP Nexus is an idea worth exploring while protecting the patent. Check it out at ipnexus.com


Name change signals expanded ability for patent owners to leverage their IP Peter Kerr Oct 01

No Comments

A name’s an important clue to how a company represents itself to the world.

So, the change to IP Nexus from IP Exchange represents a business and philosophical change for the Hong Kong based but globally oriented company.

Its founder and CEO Hidero (Hidi) Niioka got hold of sticK to remind New Zealand SME owners of the marketplace which aims to connect patent owners with others looking for the solutions the patents’ offer.

The Nexus (rather than Exchange) term seems appropriate for an organisations that’s grown considerably since first mentioned in stick in June 2012. (One definition of nexus is a connection or series of connections linking two or more things).

For startups, inventors, universities, SMEs and other entrepreneurs looking to use their IP beyond New Zealand’s shores, the continuing development of IP Nexus offers considerable advantages says Hidi.

Part of this built on three (new) pillars, compared to IP Exchange.

  • Ask an expert – post questions and get expert answers for free

  • Services marketplace – post jobs nad gets experts’ bids

  • Directory – search for specific technical or regional expertise worldwide

Hidi points out that while the NZ government (and many others around the world) promotes innovation, accelerator platforms and the like, there is a need to make related advice and services more accessible for those launching new ventures, especially those who are looking outside their home markets.

The goal of our new services is to make it easier for inventors, startups and other small businesses to develop their ventures and protect and monetise their IP,” says Hidi.

Signing up is free, so if you are just looking for basis advice, it won’t cost you anything. On the other hand, if you need specialised technical or cross-border expertise, you connect easily to the relevant professionals through a simple search.”

IP Nexus’ experts are able to answer some questions for free, and prices for services are negotiable beyond that. It has over 200 IP experts onboard representing a broad base of global and technical expertise from New Zealand and Australia, to Silicon Valley, Europe, Japan and China. It also has over 61,000 patents and other IP available for search.

Under the company’s model, patent owners can upload as many patents as they want for free for marketing to potential commercialisation agents such as IP brokers, law firms and interested technology companies.

Patent owners only pay a success fee of 4-12% is there successful sale or licence of the patent.

As is often pointed out about NZ patent holders, Kiwi businesses often completely ignore the option of selling or licensing patents overseas.

Given that most NZ inventions will also be applicable in other countries, IP Nexus is an idea worth exploring while protecting the patent. Check it out at ipnexus.com


Should you bother with venture capital funding…the numbers suggest no? Peter Kerr Aug 20

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The scramble that many startups make to secure venture capital funding may be detrimental to the budding business’s health.

In fact John Mullins, writing in Havard Business Review’s blogs, makes the point that the vast majority of successful entrepreneurs never take any venture capital (his italics). Mullins is an associate professor at London Business School.

He gives examples from around the world, but the observations are almost undoubtedly true about New Zealand too.

He quotes venture capital investor Fred Wilson of Union Square Ventures.

“The fact is that the amount of money startups raise in their seed and Series A rounds is inversely correlated with success. Yes, I mean that. Less money raised leads to more success. That is the data I stare at all the time.”

Wilson’s observation demonstrates there are a number of serious downsides in raising capital too early, and that these drawbacks have profound implications at all stages of the investment cycle. I’ve summarised the five drawbacks to VC funding made by Mullins, who also provides some interesting links supporting these arguments.

1. Pandering to VCs is a distraction.

Raising capital demands a lot of time and energy, when an entrepreneur is better off convincing prospective customers to buy – or perhaps learning why they won’t.

2. Terms sheets and shareholder agreements can burden you.

To protect their own downside risk, investors will require what are often seen by entrepreneurs as onerous terms.

3. The advice that VCs give isn’t always that good.

Unfortunately, entrepreneurs will be very likely obliged to follow the VC’s sage ‘advice’.

4. The stake you keep is small – and tends to get smaller

If money is raised later in the entrepreneurial journey, with customer traction in hand, the startup owner is in the driver’s seat, and is much more likely to find a queue of investors outside their door.

5. The odds are against you

In the VC game the very few winners pay for the losers, so most VCs are playing a high-stakes all-or-nothing game. Such odds make it extremely questionable whether entrepreneurs should put their own business into such a play.

Mullins’ take home point is that especially in the early stages, a startup business is much better off being funded and grown entirely by its customers’ cash.

Outside funding is not the be all and end all – though it can quite easily be the unintended end of the startup.

The article also has some excellent comments (as you’d expect for a HBR type article which add further insights to Mullins’ observations).


Is the future for our sheep their milk? Peter Kerr Jul 16

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Being the farm raised boy I am, I’m keen on the idea of clever new and profitable products from our ability to convert sunlight, soil and water into them.

So, Blue River Dairy, the sheep milk products company which is over 10 years old, is something to keep an eye on.

It is the creation of Keith Neylon, a 60-something entrepreneur, who has had previous lives in deer recovery (owned 10 helicopters at one stage) and salmon farming (co-pioneered its development in NZ) among other things.

He was semi-talked into exploring sheep milk potential by a meat company chairman – and saw opportunity.

There’s sheep milked around the world – but almost all is consumed in Spain, Portugal, Sardinia (four million sheep for two million people) and their own country of origin.

There’s was also an Asian and China angle. Over 85% of these countries’ peoples are allergic to cow’s milk.

The resut has been over a decade’s worth of front loading all the expense of setting up a market to production entity, investing in plant, genetics, farms and an entire system to produce sheep milk products.

He didn’t do things by half during this ‘research’ phase. Keith spent three months on an Israeli kibbutz that was one of its top sheep milk farms. Some of the knowledge from these experts has been incorporated in BRD.

Now, year round (having perfected lambing five times in two years), 4000 ewes are milked twice a day.

A new drying plant in Invercargill receives milk that has had 85% of its water removed on-farm, and most of it converted to whole sheep milk’s powder, canned onsite, most as infant formula.

This sells at a considerable premium to cow’s milk powder, though as Keith explains, it is better .

Sheep’s milk takes a baby 30 minutes to digest, compared to four and a half to five hours for cow’s milk. It has 500% more vitamin D. It doesn’t make babies skin become rashed.

Currently, hundreds of thousands of cans are tied up on China’s borders as The Middle Kingdom sorts out an issue of what it considers to be too many (up to an estimated 2000) brands of infant formula). This will pass.

But Keith is more than confident that at least 10 million milking sheep would not be an oversupply and continue to hold a price premium.

He says BRD has the best genetics, allied to a retail market position that is way ahead of any other land-based product from New Zealand.

He envisages a revitalisation of the sheep industry based on their milk – and remember they still produce lambs and wool.

Another strong point in sheep milk’s advantages is that “you never get leaching off sheep country.”

Keith is proposing that farmers become participants in the opportunity through a franchise-like system (including the all-important supply of sheep genetics), in which New Zealand, and its reputation and image, deliver high value products to a growing market.

This potential is one reason Landcorp is seriously considering an sizeable investment in the industry – perhaps alongside BRD.

I was privileged to hear him speak recently in Wellington.

This is ballsy entrepreneurship (a 10+ year lead time!), that plays to our strengths.

One day I predict he’ll be acknowledged as the man who saved the sheep industry.

 


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