Tagged: bias

Are male-dominated tenure committees holding women back in academia? - The Dismal Science

Paul Walker Apr 07, 2017

No. At the AEA website Tim Hyde discusses a paper in the American Economic Review (2017, 107(4): 1207–1238) which asks the question “Does the Gender Composition of Scientific Committees Matter?” The paper is by Manuel Bagues, Mauro Sylos-Labini, and Natalia Zinovyeva. In many countries there are concerns that male-dominated tenure committees that are convened to decide … Read More

Improving gender balance in physics - Physics Stop

Marcus Wilson Apr 07, 2017

The Institute of Physics has just released a report on recent interventions designed to improve the uptake of physics at ‘A’-level by girls*. Although there have been considerable efforts in the UK to improve the gender balance over two decades, there has not been any substantial change – about 20% of a typical A-level physics class is … Read More

Madonna teaches us a lesson in critical thinking - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Jan 25, 2017

  Maybe just a small lesson – but an important one. We should always look at context and not cherry-pick that which confirms our bias. In particular, we shouldn’t simply repeat social media claims without doing a bit of fact-checking for ourselves. It’s an important lesson at the moment because there is a lot of this going on in the social … Read More

How to check if you’re in a news echo chamber – and what to do about it - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 14, 2016

By Tom Stafford, University of Sheffield If you were surprised by the result of the Brexit vote in the UK or by the Trump victory in the US, you might live in an echo chamber – a self-reinforcing world of people who share the same opinions as you. Echo chambers are a problem, and not just because it means … Read More

Warriors, scouts, Trump’s election and your news media - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Nov 17, 2016

The media, establishment figures, and seemingly many of Clinton’s supporters,  were surprised at Trump’s victory in the US presidential elections because they think like warriors instead of scouts. Julia Galef described these different thinking processes in the video below – which I posted 6 months ago (see Are you really right?). Last week’s US presidential election result, the public uproar … Read More

Bad Science Case Study: Dog Bones - Honest Universe

Mark Hanna Oct 31, 2016

The New Zealand Herald and Jimbo’s have provided us with an idealised “bad science” case study. The New Zealand Herald article Today, the Herald published an article about a “trial” published by pet food manufacturer Jimbo’s: No bones about bones The trial was intended to evaluate how eating bones affects the dental health of dogs. Thankfully the … Read More

Being better informed – unexpected advice from The Guardian - Open Parachute

Ken Perrott Aug 03, 2016

This opinion piece by Piers Robinson in The Guardian surprised me – and then it pleased me – Russian news may be biased – but so is much western media. Surprised me because, of late, The Guardian has been shockingly one-sided. Particularly in its treatment of Russian politics, nationally and internationally. Unfortunately doesn’t include any self criticisms – that would have … Read More

A new entity is born: CDaR - Kidney Punch

John Pickering Aug 29, 2013

Have you ever been told the blood test is positive and the disease in question is shocking – Cancer, an STD (but you don’t sleep around!), MS?  Have you every wondered why it is that some drugs get withdrawn years after, and millions of prescriptions after, they were first approved?  Surely, you’ve read a headline … Continue reading → … Read More

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