Tagged: CRISPR

New Zealand science looks to the future – Sciblogs Horizon Scan - News

John Kerr Feb 20, 2017

Pandemics, predators and predicting sea-level rise are just a few of the issues covered in our Sciblogs Horizon Scan special series. We asked experts across the spectrum of New Zealand science to give us their take on the big issues in their field and what might be around the corner. What does the future hold in store for New Zealand … Read More

Get ready for CRISPR conservation - Wild Science

Helen Taylor Feb 09, 2017

New Zealand is known for its bold, proactive conservation strategies. Are we ready to use advanced gene editing techniques to save native species? Imagine being able to turn genes on and off, or change their code and alter their function. This is the reality of gene editing technologies facilitated by enzymes like CRISPR-Cas9. CRISPR is essentially a pair of … Read More

Anti-CRISPR ‘Get out of jail free’ card uncovered - Guest Work

Guest Work Jun 14, 2016

By Dr Heather Hendrickson, Senior Lecturer, Massey University The microbial world is an invisible war zone where tiny combatants – bacteria, viruses, molds and amoebae – are fiercely competing for resources. In this microbial melee there are no pulled punches and anything goes. The viruses that attack bacterial cells are called bacteriophages and there are estimated to be ~10 of … Read More

Monday Micro – killer viruses - Infectious Thoughts

Siouxsie Wiles Feb 03, 2014

Recent virus-related papers to get excited about: 1. Visualising HIV infection A paper just out in the open access journal PLOS Pathogens describes using 3D electron microscopy to visualise the Human Immune Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 infecting gut immune cells (1). If you remember, HIV is the virus which causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Read More

Monday Micro – smart viruses - Infectious Thoughts

Siouxsie Wiles Mar 04, 2013

I’ve always loved bacteriophage, the spaceship-like viruses which prey on bacteria*. They really do look like something from another planet. Phage are abundant in nature, found everywhere, from soil and water, to the guts of animals. They have two different life cycles; in the lytic cycle they infect bacteria, replicate themselves and then lyse and … Read More