Tagged: ecology

Widespread invasive species control is a risky business - Guest Work

Guest Work May 26, 2017

By R. Keller Kopf, Charles Sturt University; Dale Nimmo, Charles Sturt University, and Paul Humphries, Charles Sturt University In 1977, on the islands of French Polynesia, government authorities released a predatory snail. They hoped this introduction would effectively control another species of invasive snail, previously introduced to supply escargot. Instead, by the early … Read More

Step 5, release your mammoth: NZ scientists tackle de-extinction consequences - Wild Science

Helen Taylor May 09, 2017

Most research on de-extinction focuses on the technology behind making it happen. It’s refreshing to see a group of conservation scientists examining what happens when you release these species into the wild. What comes after de-extinction? The latest issue of the  journal Functional Ecology has a special feature on de-extinction. Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you won’t have … Read More

Exploring the past to understand the ecological requirements of de-extinction candidate species - Guest Work

Guest Work May 09, 2017

If we are going to resurrect an extinct species, where will it live and what will it eat? Sciblogs is running a series of posts on de-extinction to coincide with a special issue of the journal Functional Ecology focusing on the topic. In this guest post, special issue author Dr Jamie Wood from Landcare Research looks to the past to find answers … Read More

Conservation genetics of de-extinction: a primer - Guest Work

Guest Work May 09, 2017

Could we really bring an extinct species back from the dead, and, if we did – what happens next? Sciblogs is running a series of posts on de-extinction to coincide with a special issue of the journal Functional Ecology focusing on the topic. In this guest post, special issue author Dr Tammy Steeves from the University of Canterbury examines the genetic … Read More

De-extinction: the devil is in the details - Guest Work

Guest Work May 09, 2017

If we could resurrect an extinct species, should we? Sciblogs is running a series of posts on de-extinction to coincide with a special feature issue of the journal Functional Ecology focusing on the issue. In this guest post, special issue editor Prof Phil Seddon from the University of Otago delves into the realities of bringing a species back from extinction.  Conservationists … Read More

Conservation’s horizon in New Zea la-la land - Politecol

- Wayne Linklater Jan 30, 2017

Designing ecosystems, reconciliation ecology for conservation The theme for the influential Ecological Society of America’s annual conference last year was “Novel Ecosystems in the Anthropocene”. A novel ecosystem is a human-made habitat and community of plants and animals. Novel ecosystems can be planned, accidental, or caused by poor environmental management that cannot be undone. And Anthropocene describes the current geological age when … Read More

Forest health in a changing climate - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 27, 2017

By Dr Cate Macinnis-Ng, Senior Lecturer and Rutherford Discovery Fellow, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland There’s still so much to learn about forests ecosystems, especially threatening processes in a changing world. We know forests are essential for human health and well-being. They supply food and building materials for people across the globe and forests also store carbon, regulate … Read More

Life’s a beach: NZ scientists on their favourite beaches - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 16, 2017

Many Kiwis have a favourite seaside spot they escape to in the summer and scientists are no exception. In this NIWA Summer Series article, six scientists reveal their summer getaway beaches and reflect on how these holiday hotspots are changing. Dr Ken Grange, Regional Manager, Nelson. Dr Ken Grange. Credit: NIWA. Beach: Rarawa Beach, east coast Far North How long have you been … Read More

In search of salmon - Field Work

Guest Work Dec 26, 2016

Phil Jellyman is jet boating up the Waimakariri River in Canterbury – not because it’s a fun thing to do but in search of salmon. The NIWA freshwater fish ecologist is planning to implant acoustic tags on the fish to find out whether irrigation schemes are affecting their migration to spawning grounds up river. Along the river he will install … Read More

Local extinctions: Climate change’s vanishing trick - News

John Kerr Dec 09, 2016

Now you see them, now you don’t. Hundreds of species have already undergone ‘local extinctions’ because of climate change, according to new a study. As overall temperatures increase around the world thanks to climate change, plants and animals are starting to shift their geographic range closer to the cooler poles of the planet, or higher up the slopes of mountains. Read More