Tagged: language

If we ever came across aliens, would we be able to understand them? - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 29, 2016

James Carney, Lancaster University Many scientists believe that alien civilisations exist. For them, the question is now whether we will encounter them in the near future or a very long time from now, rather than if at all. So let’s imagine that we suddenly stand face-to-face with members of an alien species. What would we do … Read More

Amazing animal facts - Pointing At Science

Steve Pointing Jul 06, 2016

Birds that fly non-stop, central heating for ants, and decoding the language of pigs – all this and more on Dear Science today on 95.0 bFM radio, or listen to the podcast on demand. Birds that fly non stop We’ve all heard about amazing feats of endurance by migrating birds, and especially those that cross the oceans. Several species … Read More

The race to digitise language records of the Pacific region before it is too late - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 22, 2016

Nick Thieberger, University of Melbourne A suitcase of reel-to-reel audio tapes arrived recently at the School of Languages and Linguistics at the University of Melbourne. They were from Madang, in Papua New Guinea (PNG), were made in the 1960s and some contain the only known records of some of the languages of PNG. There are very few records … Read More

Moa and Maori dogs – lessons for modern ecological life - Infrequently Asked Questions

Lynley Hargreaves Sep 24, 2014

Dr Priscilla Wehi As a zoologist living within a Māori community, Dr Priscilla Wehi became interested in the ecological information contained in Māori oral tradition. When she discovered a potentially new approach to exploring ecology by dating ancestral sayings, or whakataukī, she and Hēmi Whaanga at the University of Waikato developed a group. Their work on whakataukī has created … Read More

Left-handed myths and the origin of language - Infrequently Asked Questions

Lynley Hargreaves May 22, 2014

Emeritus Professor Michael Corballis Left and right-handed people are watching pantomimes and making up words in the latest Marsden-funded work by the University of Auckland’s Emeritus Professor Michael Corballis. While the study participants are thinking about gestures and language, the research team is watching their brains. Professor Corballis explains why this may help us understand how talking in humans … Read More

Another green growth report - The Dismal Science

Bill Kaye-Blake Nov 14, 2012

The industry advocacy group Pure Advantage has released another report. When I tried to download the report or the executive summary, it insisted on an email address. This seemed a bit strange, a bit controlling, frankly. The report runs to about 300 pages. I have not read it, and doubt that I will. Long reports [...] … Read More

TOSP Episode 14: December 12th 2011 - misc.ience

Aimee Whitcroft Dec 14, 2011

[Original post on the Sciblogs The Official Sciblogs Podcast site] This week’s a little special. In addition to aimee and Elf discussing how our brains process syntax and vocabulary (differently, it turns out!), the biggest black holes yet discovered and a 17 year old who’s made huge strides in the fight against cancer, Elf also [...] … Read More

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