Tagged: moa

Step 5, release your mammoth: NZ scientists tackle de-extinction consequences - Wild Science

Helen Taylor May 09, 2017

Most research on de-extinction focuses on the technology behind making it happen. It’s refreshing to see a group of conservation scientists examining what happens when you release these species into the wild. What comes after de-extinction? The latest issue of the  journal Functional Ecology has a special feature on de-extinction. Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you won’t have … Read More

Exploring the past to understand the ecological requirements of de-extinction candidate species - Guest Work

Guest Work May 09, 2017

If we are going to resurrect an extinct species, where will it live and what will it eat? Sciblogs is running a series of posts on de-extinction to coincide with a special issue of the journal Functional Ecology focusing on the topic. In this guest post, special issue author Dr Jamie Wood from Landcare Research looks to the past to find answers … Read More

Are deer sort of like moa? - So Shoot Me

Jamie Steer Apr 12, 2017

In this two-part series, Dr Jamie Steer ponders whether the ‘deer are like moa’ debate has passed its use-by date. Writing on the impacts of introduced deer in the Transactions of the New Zealand Institute in 1892, the Reverend P. Walsh argued that New Zealand’s native forests were poorly equipped to deal with grazing mammals. Taking the pre-human forest as … Read More

De-extinction dilemma: Bring back the moa or save the kiwi? - News

John Kerr Feb 28, 2017

Adding previously-extinct species to our conservation checklist will strain already tight conservation budgets, say a team of New Zealand and Australian scientists. Little Bush Moa, Anomalopteryx didiformis. © Te Papa. De-extinction – resurrecting extinct species with the help of modern technology – has been largely confined to the realms of sci-fi. But now technology is catching up with the fantasy. Read More

A case of mistaken identity for Australia’s extinct big bird - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 14, 2016

Trevor Worthy, Flinders University Australia is renowned for once being home to a group of gigantic birds known as the mihirungs. These birds are distantly related to waterfowl and included the impressive Dromornis stirtoni, the largest bird ever known on the planet at about 450kg in weight. An artist’s impression of Genyornis newtoni. Anne Musser, Australian Museum … Read More

Distinct diets of extinct moa - News

Sarah-Jane O'Connor Jan 13, 2016

Extinct moa co-existed in pre-human New Zealand because they had a diverse range of diets and feeding strategies, New Zealand and Australian researchers have found. New research, published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, London, combining CT and MRI scans and software used after the Canterbury earthquakes has detailed the likely diet and feeding strategy of five of … Read More

Moa and Maori dogs – lessons for modern ecological life - Infrequently Asked Questions

Lynley Hargreaves Sep 24, 2014

Dr Priscilla Wehi As a zoologist living within a Māori community, Dr Priscilla Wehi became interested in the ecological information contained in Māori oral tradition. When she discovered a potentially new approach to exploring ecology by dating ancestral sayings, or whakataukī, she and Hēmi Whaanga at the University of Waikato developed a group. Their work on whakataukī has created … Read More