Tagged: Pollution

How we discovered pollution-poisoned crustaceans in the Mariana Trench - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 21, 2017

By Alan Jamieson, Newcastle University Even animals from the deepest places on Earth have accumulated pollutants made by humans. That’s the unfortunate finding of a new study by myself with colleagues from the University of Aberdeen and the James Hutton Institute, published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. Up until now I have tended to stick to the nice … Read More

How microbeads in your bodywash could be helping chemicals enter the foodchain - Nano Girl

Michelle Dickinson Sep 06, 2016

In 1976 chemical engineer John Ugelstad invented a technique on earth that other scientists believed could only be carried out in the weightless conditions of space. His discovery enabled the mass production of monodisperse spheres, tiny microscopic spherical plastic beads. The beads were typically 0.5 to 500 micrometres in diameter, about the width of 1 to 5 strands of human … Read More

New Zealand is letting economics rule its environmental policies - Guest Work

Guest Work Aug 23, 2016

By Stephen Knight-Lenihan, University of Auckland Balancing the environment with development is tricky. One way for policymakers to include the value of ecosystems in development is to set limits for pollution and other environmental impacts, known as environmental bottom lines (EBLs). These can be a helpful way of embedding into an economy the value of ecosystems. They also help … Read More

New Zealand river water quality – good news or bad? - Infrequently Asked Questions

Lynley Hargreaves Aug 11, 2016

Dr Scott Larned Improvements in some components of river water quality are encouraging, but it’s too early to declare victory, says NIWA’s Dr Scott Larned. In a recently published paper in the New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research, Dr Larned reported ten-year trends in New Zealand river water quality. He tells us what has improved … Read More

Savings on health costs would help offset more ambitious climate pledges - Griffin's Gadgets

Peter Griffin Dec 09, 2015

The Climate Action Tracker, which involves five independent research organisations analysing the emissions reduction targets of the nations represented at COP21 in Paris has totted up the sums now that 158 climate pledges have been officially tabled. The upshot is that the pledges will result in 2.7 degrees Celsius of temperature rise in 2100, if the governments all met their … Read More

Plastic oceans, plastic diets: The unsavoury reality for seabirds - News

Erica Mather Sep 02, 2015

A new study predicts that 99 per cent of the world’s seabirds will consume plastic by 2050.  Seabirds easily mistake brightly coloured plastics for food or accidentally swallow pieces such as bottle caps, bags and fibres from synthetic clothing that have washed out to sea from waste deposits, sewers and rivers. Scientists from CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial … Read More

Lead pollution beat Amundsen and Scott to the South Pole by 20 years - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 31, 2014

By Joe McConnell, Desert Research Institute We know elements of the story. It was 1911, as Robert Scott and Roald Amundsen raced to the South Pole. Temperatures were below -50˚C. Scott was British; Amundsen a Norwegian. Sled dogs were dying, and the explorers suffered from frostbite. The stakes were high, with financing of future explorations hanging in the balance … Read More

Frozen Friday Fab Four #6 The importance of basic science - Ice Doctor

Victoria Metcalf May 30, 2014

Four of the Antarctic or anything else headlines/social media bits that have grabbed my attention this week. Remarkably it looks like the diminutive Kiwi is the closest living relative of the extinct elephant bird. Image source: Wikimedia Commons uploaded by Glen Stewart. The importance of basic science 1. As a scientist I actually love it when what we think … Read More

How much dairying is too much in terms of water quality? - Waiology

Waiology Dec 17, 2013

By Daniel Collins On 21 November the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, Jan Wright, released her second report on water quality. It warned that business-as-usual dairy expansion by 2020 would leave our lakes and rivers more degraded than they are now, even with improved mitigation. I’d now like to re-cap what the report concluded, how it got there, … Read More

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