Tagged: Psychology

Mapping the link between biodiversity and wellbeing – NatureBuzz - The Psychology Report

Sarb Johal Apr 24, 2017

In this week’s Psychology Report I talked with Laurie Parma from the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge in England, about Nature Buzz (iTunes / Android)- the new research application they have developed to explore the links between nature and well-being.     Have a read of this conversation to understand more … Read More

Quality of relationships matter for fathers and their children’s development - The Psychology Report

Sarb Johal Mar 20, 2017

In this Psychology Report, I talk with Associate Professor Claire Vallotton from the Department of Human Development and Family Studies and Michigan State University in the USA, about father’s parenting stress and its relationship to cognitive and language development in toddlers. This interview is based on the findings of this paper, and you can listen to the podcast as … Read More

How old is behavioural economics? - The Dismal Science

Paul Walker Feb 01, 2017

I came across an interesting paper the other day that suggests behavioural economics is older than most people think. The paper “The Relations of Recent Psychological Developments to Economic Theory” by Z. Clark Dickinson in The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 33, No. 3: 377-421 dates from May 1919! The summary of the paper reads, The purely objective factors … Read More

The Science of Christmas - News

John Kerr Dec 18, 2016

As the big day approaches, there is no shortage of scientists turning their inquisitive minds to the mysteries of Christmas. In the spirit of the festive season, Sciblogs brings you a tinsel entwined ‘wrap-up’ of Noel-related research. Naughty or nice? Not so important for Santa Santa pays a visit to the Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children. Source: BelfastLive. Read More

How to check if you’re in a news echo chamber – and what to do about it - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 14, 2016

By Tom Stafford, University of Sheffield If you were surprised by the result of the Brexit vote in the UK or by the Trump victory in the US, you might live in an echo chamber – a self-reinforcing world of people who share the same opinions as you. Echo chambers are a problem, and not just because it means … Read More

The festive psychology behind Christmas TV advertising - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 12, 2016

By Cathrine Jansson-Boyd, Anglia Ruskin University Christmas is traditionally a time for giving. And for most of us, giving means buying – the perfect excuse for major retailers to conduct an advertising assault that pulls on our heart strings and empties our pockets. Seasonal TV adverts are usually full of signs and symbols playing on our subconscious, and … Read More

Why time seems to go by more quickly as we get older - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 07, 2016

By Christian Yates, University of Bath When we were children, the summer holidays seemed to last forever, and the wait between Christmases felt like an eternity. So why is that when we get older, the time just seems to zip by, with weeks, months and entire seasons disappearing from a blurred calendar at dizzying speed? This apparently accelerated time … Read More

Hearing voices is more common than you might think - Guest Work

Guest Work Oct 23, 2016

By John Read, University of East London Hearing voices that other people can’t is a meaningful experience. Like dreams, they can usually be understood in terms of one’s life experiences. Within mental health services, however, the prevailing medical model means some practitioners pay attention only to their presence, not their meaning. Psychiatry’s diagnostic bibles, the American DSM-5 … Read More