Tagged: Sustainability

The decoupling delusion: rethinking growth and sustainability - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 15, 2017

By James Ward, University of South Australia; Keri Chiveralls, CQUniversity Australia; Lorenzo Fioramonti, University of Pretoria; Paul Sutton, University of Denver, and Robert Costanza, Australian National University Our economy and society ultimately depend on natural resources: land, water, material (such as metals) and energy. But some scientists have recognised that … Read More

Is a vegetarian diet really more environmentally friendly than eating meat? - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 30, 2017

By Wayne Martindale, Sheffield Hallam University Beef from Brazil, avocados from Mexico, lamb from New Zealand, wines from South Africa and green beans from Kenya – food shopping lists have a distinctly international flavour. And with many questioning the sustainability of importing so much food from so far away, we are beginning to ask if switching to a … Read More

The “Great Acceleration” is cause for great concern. - Guest Work

Guest Work Jan 18, 2017

By Prof Ralph E H Sims, Massey University, Palmerston North The future for secure and peaceful human life on our planet is under threat. A wide range of socio-economic indicators that illustrate global growth parameters from 1750 to 2010 confirm the rapid acceleration that has become particularly evident over the past six decades as world population … Read More

Bottling water and cutting out the middle-cow - The Dismal Science

Eric Crampton Apr 08, 2016

Over at the Christchurch Press, I went through the current controversies about an Ashburton water bottling plant. New Zealand allocates water drawing rights through a consenting system. Government allocates drawing rights for water, but those rights aren’t really tradeable other than by selling the land that goes with the consent. All over the Canterbury plains, farmers have drawing rights … Read More

Kids Greening Taupō: A Step Towards Transformation - Curious and Curiouser

Victoria Metcalf Mar 02, 2016

In this guest post by Thea DePetris, a Masters student at the University of Waikato, she outlines why the world’s wicked problems demand a transformation of our teaching systems and showcases one example, the Kids Greening Taupō community restoration education programme. The issues of the modern world aren’t getting any simpler as ‘wicked’ problems pervade our societal structure and environment. In response, educational … Read More

Removing atmospheric CO2 won’t save us: we must cut emissions now - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 08, 2015

Pete Smith, University of Aberdeen and Pep Canadell, CSIRO Over 190 countries are negotiating in Paris a global agreement to stabilise climate change at less than 2℃ above pre-industrial global average temperatures. For a reasonable chance of keeping warming under 2℃ we can emit a further 865 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2). The climate … Read More

How a global solar alliance can help developing countries - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 07, 2015

Xavier Lemaire, UCL The International Solar Alliance announced by India at the Paris climate conference invites together 120 countries to support the expansion of solar technologies in the developing world. The cost of solar cells has decreased spectacularly over the past four decades, and the trend seems likely to continue. Solar energy has moved from a … Read More

Book review: Big World, Small Planet - Scibooks

Guest Work Dec 03, 2015

How do we go about communicating that the whole of the biosphere (and humanity) is at stake? Professor David Teather looks for answers in the book Big World, Small Planet in a review originally featured in the latest issue of Forest & Bird magazine. Convincing others to care for the natural world is a matter for both … Read More

The race to fish: how fishing subsidies are emptying our oceans - Guest Work

Guest Work Oct 19, 2015

Rashid Sumaila, University of British Columbia Fish numbers are rapidly dwindling globally, and fishery subsidies are one of the key drivers behind this decline. In 2009, these subsidies totalled about US$35 billion, creating incentives for fishers around the world to increase their catch. But this short-term “race to fish” is jeopardising the long-term environmental, social, and economic … Read More