Our Bloggers

Kimberley Collins

Kimberley Collins

Writes for: Up and Atom

Kimberley is a science communicator with a background in ecology and conservation. Her lifelong passion for wildlife has taken her around New Zealand, to Antarctica, the SubAntarctic Islands and other offshore sanctuaries.

Her original career in conservation biology was diverted when a stint working in public programmes at Waikato Museum persuaded Kimberley that communicating science was what she wanted to do.

She completed a Masters in Science Communication at Otago University, researching how scientists use social media to communicate. Since completing her studies, Kimberley has worked with a range of conservation organisations as a communicator. She spent a year working at ZEALANDIA in Wellington and most recently at Forest & Bird as their online communications coordinator.

In her spare time, Kimberley runs an outreach programme called Pop Up Science, which takes science beyond the walls of institutions by popping up with exhibits for children to engage with.

Laura Goodall

Laura Goodall

Writes for: Mātau Taiao

He kaiwhakamāori pūtaiao a Laura. E ako ana ia Te Reo Māori ki TWoA. Laura tells stories about science in a way that tries to make it understandable and relevant to ordinary people. Her background is in science, communications and Indigenous Peoples’ perspectives – and in 2016 she studied Māori Science at VUW. She is now storyteller for Curious Minds (curiousminds.nz) and continuing her journey in Te Reo Māori. You can find her on Twitter: @lauragoodall

Lynley Hargreaves

Lynley Hargreaves

Writes for: Infrequently Asked Questions

Lynley Hargreaves is a freelance science communicator with a background in mathematical physics. After a stint overseas at Physics Today magazine, she spent happy years working for the Royal Society Te Apārangi, albeit with intermittent disappearances to the mountains of the West Coast of the South Island. From this now permanent West Coast base, she has been conducting IAQ interviews since the beginning of 2014, asking a wide range of researchers how their work can give us insights into the workings of the world.

Marcus Wilson

Writes for: Physics Stop

Dr Marcus Wilson is a lecturer in the Engineering Department at Waikato University and author of the Physics Stop blog. His current research involves modelling of the electrical behaviour of the human brain during natural sleep, focussing particularly on the transitions between sleep states. Previous research interests include infra-red physics and signature control (stealth) and quantum Monte Carlo methods.
He graduated from Cambridge University in 1992 (BA Hons) and completed his PhD at Bristol University in 1995.

Marie Brown

Marie Brown

Writes for: The Nature of Things

Marie is the Senior Policy Analyst for the Environmental Defence Society, a long-running Auckland-based NGO, and lead author of Vanishing Nature: facing New Zealand’s biodiversity crisis. Her research interests include ecology and conservation, compliance and enforcement of environmental law and environmental policy.

Mark Hanna

Mark Hanna

Writes for: Honest Universe

Mark Hanna is a consumer advocate, intersectional feminist, amateur astronomer, and science lover living in New Zealand. He writes primarily about consumer protection with a focus on the alternative health industry, but also about other topics that he finds interesting or frustrating.

Matt Nolan

Matt Nolan

Writes for: The Dismal Science

Matt Nolan is an economist with the forecasting team at Wellington-based Infometrics. He enjoys writing on a broad range of economic issues; however his focus is on the household sector including the labour market and consumer spending. Within Infometrics, he is responsible for forecasting the outlook for consumer spending and the labour market, and giving clients an idea of the risks around these forecasts – and what they mean for their bottom line.

Michael Corballis

Michael Corballis

Writes for: Mind Matters

Michael Corballis was born and educated in New Zealand before completing his PhD in psychology at McGill University, Montreal in 1965. He joined the Psychology Department there in 1968, before being appointed Professor of Psychology at the University of Auckland in 1978, where he is now Emeritus Professor. He has published 11 books and over 400 articles and book chapters on such topics as cognition, memory, language, brain asymmetry, and human evolution. His most recent books are The Recursive Mind (2011), Pieces of Mind (2012), and The Wandering Mind (2013).