Building blogs of Science

[Open] Science Sunday — 13.12.09

Fabiana Kubke Dec 13, 2009

More Sunday sharing thanks to the people in the internet and Open Access … ASCILITE is over, but it left me with a lot of work to do because of the great sessions in the conference. You can get a lot of the information covered there thanks to Grainne Conole on Cloudworks. I also posted some [...] … Read More

Getting the timing right for song control

Fabiana Kubke Dec 11, 2009

Songbirds have evolved special areas in the brain that are used for song learning and song production. Two types of output connections from a cortical area known as HVC (proper name) each go to two ‘separate’ pathways. Some HVC neurons connect directly with neurons in a brain area called RA (robust nucleus of the archopallium), [...] … Read More

Second Life and the future of education

Fabiana Kubke Dec 07, 2009

The 2009 conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (#ASCILITE09) is currently taking place in Auckland New Zealand. Scott Diener, from the University of Auckland IT services delivered a great Keynote address centered around Second Life. A guided tour through the long white cloud island Diener took us through a tour of the [...] … Read More

[Open] Science Sunday — 6.12.09

Fabiana Kubke Dec 06, 2009

These are some of the fun (and more serious) stuff I found around the magic world of the internet and Open Access. I give my favourite tweet this week to @MsBehaviour (again) for pointing her tweeps to the Manchester Manifesto. Her tweet links to a great post on the University of Manchester that summarises the issues [...] … Read More

[Open] Science Sunday — 22-11-09

Fabiana Kubke Nov 22, 2009

Roaming through the web, I found great stuff this week that shows the value of an ‘Open’ attitude in science. The Rutherford Medal, New Zealand’s top science prize, was awarded to Professor Peter Hunter from the Bioengineering Institute. Peter Hunter is also one of the minds behind the Physiome Project, “…a worldwide public domain effort to provide [...] … Read More

Not just a pretty face: The facial ruff of barn owls and sound localisation

Fabiana Kubke Nov 19, 2009

Barn owls are the subject of many studies on auditory neuroscience because of their exquisite ability to localize sound. The auditory system is interesting from a neuronal computation point of view because the inner ear, where sounds are detected, relays no information to the brain as to the location of the sound source in space. [...] … Read More