Environment and Ecology

Mining companies are required to return quarried sites to their ‘natural character’. But is that enough? - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 27, 2020

Shaun Rosier, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington New Zealand has more than 1,100 registered quarries. Some of these mined sites are small, rural operations, but a significant number are large and complex, and within a city’s urban boundaries. As part of the resource consent application for a mining project, quarry operators are usually issued with a … Read More

What would happen if we cut down the Amazon rainforest? - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Nov 18, 2020

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz What would happen if we cut down the entire Amazon rainforest? Could it be replaced by an equal … Read More

Scientists thought these seals evolved in the north. 3-million-year-old fossils from New Zealand suggest otherwise - Hot off the press

Guest Author Nov 12, 2020

James Patrick Rule, Monash University; Erich Fitzgerald, Museums Victoria; Felix Georg Marx, Te Papa Tongarewa, and Justin W. Adams, Monash University A fossil discovery in New Zealand has revealed a new species of monk seal that once called Australasia home. We introduce the three million-year-old seal, Eomonachus belegaerensis, in a paper published today in the Proceedings of the Royal … Read More

New cyclone forecasts: why impacts should be the focus of hazardous weather warnings - Guest Work

Guest Author Nov 11, 2020

Sally Potter, GNS Science November 12 marks the 50th anniversary of Cyclone Bhola, the deadliest weather event on modern record. When this storm made landfall over Bangladesh, it coincided with a lunar high tide. The subsequent storm surge killed at least 300,000 people. This month also marks the start of the cyclone season in the Pacific. The outlook … Read More

Why do humans instinctively reject evidence contrary to their beliefs? - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Nov 11, 2020

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz Why do humans instinctively reject evidence contrary to their beliefs? Do we understand why and how people … Read More

Crabs, carcinisation, and crappy headlines - BioBlog

Alison Campbell Nov 10, 2020

This is a post of two parts: the interesting tale of convergence involving crab-like creatures, and the very poor – nay, crappy (because I like the alliteration) – headline on a popular article about it. Part 1: the history of carcinization in crustaceans, described in this 2017 paper in the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (Keiler, Wirkner, & … Read More

UN report says up to 850,000 animal viruses could be caught by humans, unless we protect nature - COVID-19

Guest Author Nov 01, 2020

Katie Woolaston, Queensland University of Technology and Judith Lorraine Fisher Human damage to biodiversity is leading us into a pandemic era. The virus that causes COVID-19, for example, is linked to similar viruses in bats, which may have been passed to humans via pangolins or another species. Environmental destruction such as land clearing, deforestation, climate change, intense agriculture and the … Read More

Genome and satellite technology reveal recovery rates and impacts of climate change on southern right whales - Guest Work

Guest Author Oct 31, 2020

Emma Carroll After close to a decade of globe-spanning effort, the genome of the southern right whale has been released this week, giving us deeper insights into the histories and recovery of whale populations across the southern hemisphere. Up to 150,000 southern right whales were killed between 1790 and 1980. This whaling drove the global population from perhaps 100,000 … Read More