Environment and Ecology

New code for controlling new food varieties (FASNZ; GMO, or not) - Code for life

Grant Jacobs Apr 09, 2018

New Zealanders and Australians might like to contribute (last-minute!*) submissions to revise Food Standards Australia and New Zealand’s code for controlling new food varieties, FSANZ is seeking input from the community on whether food derived using new breeding techniques (NBTs) should be captured for pre-market approval under the Code, and whether the definitions for ‘food produced using gene technology’ … Read More

Green sky thinking - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Apr 09, 2018

We are starting to see more scenarios about getting to a “decarbonised” future. One where greenhouse gas emissions are no longer a problem. Many scenarios are forgettable. The good ones have the power to create the change. Shell has added a new futures scenario, called Sky, to its New Lens scenario set. I think … Read More

The SMC Video Competition: The Hihi Sperm Race - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Apr 04, 2018

Last week, the results of the Science Media Centre Video Competition was judged. It was an incredible competition, open to previous participants of the SMC’s science video workshops. There were eight entries, and the judges were incredibly impressed with the creativity and quality of the entries. I was fortunate enough to watch all eight entries and chat to a number … Read More

We spent nine years tracking South Africa’s white sharks. What we learnt - Guest Work

Guest Work Apr 03, 2018

Alison Kock, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. How big is South Africa’s white shark population? Nobody really knows: estimates range from 500 to more than 1200. This is an important question because the species is under enormous pressure. South Africa’s sharks … Read More

Citizen scientist scuba divers shed light on the impact of warming oceans on marine life - Guest Work

Guest Work Apr 02, 2018

Madeleine De Gabriele, The Conversation This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Rising ocean temperatures may result in worldwide change for shallow reef ecosystems, according to research published yesterday in Science Advances. The study, based on thousands of surveys carried out by volunteer scuba divers, gives new insights into the … Read More

How the first trees grew so tall with hollow cores – new research - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 30, 2018

Christopher M. Berry, Cardiff University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Imagine a world without trees, and then try to think about the changes that would need to happen for these trees to evolve from the small primitive plants that came before them. I spend as much time as I … Read More

Audrey Eagle’s Botanical Drawings - A History of NZ Science in 25 Objects

Jean Balchin Mar 28, 2018

When I was a child, my father and I would sit at the kitchen table after tea, armed with a set of Reeve’s watercolour paints, a grubby cup of water, sheets of cartridge paper and various picture books depicting the flora and fauna of Great Britain. My Dad was quite the artist, and he patiently taught me how … Read More

Future ‘ocean cities’ need green engineering above and below the waterline - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 27, 2018

Katherine Dafforn, UNSW; Ana Bugnot, UNSW; Eliza Heery, National University of Singapore, and Mariana Mayer-Pinto, UNSW This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Population growth has seen skylines creep ever higher and entire cities rise from ocean depths. The latest “ocean city” is the Chinese-developed … Read More

My dyslexic perspective on academia – and how I found science communication - Guest Work

Guest Work Mar 26, 2018

Grainne Cleary, Deakin University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. I am an academic with dyslexia and I would like to share my story with you. Dyslexia in academia is a conundrum – it is basically a learning difficulty, and coping with dyslexia is a very personal journey. It is … Read More

Betting on bird sperm in a race to help hihi - Wild Science

Helen Taylor Mar 26, 2018

It’s well known that funding for conservation is seriously lacking, so we’ve had to get creative when it comes to raising money to protect New Zealand’s little ray of sunshine, the hihi. The hihi – a taonga in trouble Have you seen this bird? Probably not – the hihi is pretty hard to find (Image credit: Helen Taylor) Research … Read More