Environment and Ecology

Scion’s newest Emeritus Scientist - Mātau Taiao

Rosemary Rangitauira Sep 29, 2021

Scion has appointed Dr Tanira Kingi (Ngāti Whakaue, Te Arawa), who’s currently working with Māori landowners to find alternative ways to use their land, as its newest Emeritus Scientist. Scion’s former Research Leader in Primary Industry Systems is an agricultural economist with 30-years-experience working in the primary industry sector. Tanira says the current industry infrastructure for meat, milk and … Read More

Climate explained: what is an ice age and how often do they happen? - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Sep 29, 2021

    Climate explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz What is an ice age? Do they have to last a certain amount of time to count, … Read More

Bright skies named colour of the year – here’s why there’s so much more to the heavens than blue - Guest Work

Guest Author Sep 28, 2021

Daniel Brown, Nottingham Trent University   The colour of 2022 will be “bright skies”, according to paint manufacturer Dulux. This mellow light blue may certainly seem familiar. Depending on where and at what time of the day you look at the sky, you might well expect to catch a glimpse of a similar colour. Yet take the time to … Read More

What is dust? And where does it all come from? - Hot off the press

Guest Author Sep 27, 2021

Mark Patrick Taylor, Macquarie University; Cynthia Faye Isley, Macquarie University; Kara Fry, Macquarie University, and Max M Gillings, Macquarie University   Everything in our homes gathers dust. But what exactly is it? Where does it come from, and why does it keep coming back? Is it from outside? Is it fibres from our clothes and cells from our skin? Yes, … Read More

Pinpointing the role of climate change in every storm is impossible – and a luxury most countries can’t afford - The Changing Climate

Guest Author Sep 23, 2021

Friederike Otto, University of Oxford and Luke Harrington, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington   Tropical Storm Ida recently left a path of devastation across the US, capping a summer beset by wildfires, heatwaves and floods which broke records around the world. The inevitable question after each of these extreme weather events is the same: to what extent … Read More

Don’t plan on orderly transitions - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Sep 21, 2021

The nature, scale, and pace of change is central to futures work. But usually more attention is given to identifying what’s happening rather than what needs to happen.   Are we living in fast times? Many futures studies focus on how fast the world is changing now. Partly that seems to be a marketing strategy – who’s going … Read More

Bringing woolly mammoths back from extinction might not be such a bad idea — ethicists explain - News

Guest Author Sep 16, 2021

Julian Koplin, The University of Melbourne and Christopher Gyngell, The University of Melbourne   US startup Colossal Biosciences has announced plans to bring woolly mammoths, or animals like them, back from extinction and into the frosty landscape of the Siberian tundra. Colossal has received US$15 million in initial funds to support research conducted by Harvard geneticist George … Read More

Climate explained: how much of the world’s energy comes from fossil fuels and could we replace it all with renewables? - Planetary Ecology

Robert McLachlan Sep 15, 2021

How are fossil fuels formed, why do they release carbon dioxide and how much of the world’s energy do they provide? And what are the renewable energy sources that could replace fossil fuels? Fossil fuels were formed over millions of years from the remains of plants and animals trapped in sediments and then transformed by heat and pressure. Most … Read More

We managed to toilet train cows (and they learned faster than a toddler). It could help combat climate change - Hot off the press

Guest Author Sep 14, 2021

Douglas Elliffe, University of Auckland and Lindsay Matthews, University of Auckland   Can we toilet train cattle? Would we want to? The answer to both of these questions is yes — and doing so could help us address issues of water contamination and climate change. Cattle urine is high in nitrogen, and this contributes to a range of environmental problems. Read More