Environment and Ecology

More people means more emissions. So how about fewer people? - The Dismal Science

Michael Reddell May 24, 2017

I’ve never had that much interest in climate change.  Perhaps it comes from living in Wellington.   If average local temperatures were a couple of degrees warmer here most people would be quite happy.    And as successive earthquakes seem to have the South Island pushing under the North Island, raising the land levels around here –  you can … Read More

Avoiding the strange of climate change - News

John Kerr May 23, 2017

Children alive today will find themselves living in a totally different climate in the future, should greenhouse gas emissions continue unchecked, warns a new study. Climate change does what it says on the tin – it changes the climate. The question of when and where we will start to notice those changes is tackled in a new, Kiwi-led study published … Read More

Maybe we can, but should we? Deciding whether to bring back extinct species - Guest Work

Guest Work May 19, 2017

Gwenllian Iacona, The University of Queensland and Iadine Chadès, CSIRO De-extinction – the science of reviving species that have been lost – has moved from the realm of science-fiction to something that is now nearly feasible. Some types of lost mammals, birds or frogs may soon be able to be revived through de-extinction technologies. Read More

New Zealand’s Alpine Fault reveals extreme underground heat and fluid pressure - Guest Work

Guest Work May 18, 2017

By Rupert Sutherland, Victoria University of Wellington An international team that drilled almost a kilometre deep into New Zealand’s Alpine Fault, which is expected to rupture in a major earthquake in the next decades, has found extremely hot temperatures and high fluid pressures. Our findings, published today in Nature, describe these surprising underground conditions. They have broad … Read More

Not a lizard nor a dinosaur, tuatara is the sole survivor of a once-widespread reptile group - Guest Work

Guest Work May 12, 2017

By Marc Emyr Huw Jones, University of Adelaide Have you ever heard of the tuatara? It’s a reptile that decapitates birds with its saw-like jaws, lives to about 100 years old, and can remain active in near-freezing temperatures. It’s also the sole survivor of a lineage as old as the first dinosaurs. May 2017 marks 150 … Read More

NZ scientists leading de-extinction discussion - News

John Kerr May 11, 2017

If we could resurrect an extinct species like the moa or the mammoth, how would it fare out in the big bad world? This week the journal Functional Ecology published a special feature series on the ecology of de-extinction, including a number of articles by New Zealand authors. Sciblogs has dived into the de-extinction discussion with a special miniseries on de-extinction … Read More

Evidence of ancient life in hot springs on Earth could point to fossil life on Mars - Guest Work

Guest Work May 11, 2017

By Tara Djokic, UNSW Fossil evidence of early life has been found in old hot spring deposits in the Pilbara, Western Australia, that date back almost 3.48 billion years. This extends the known evidence of life at land-based hot springs on Earth by about 3 billion years. Not only is the find exciting for what it might … Read More

Step 5, release your mammoth: NZ scientists tackle de-extinction consequences - Wild Science

Helen Taylor May 09, 2017

Most research on de-extinction focuses on the technology behind making it happen. It’s refreshing to see a group of conservation scientists examining what happens when you release these species into the wild. What comes after de-extinction? The latest issue of the  journal Functional Ecology has a special feature on de-extinction. Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you won’t have … Read More

Exploring the past to understand the ecological requirements of de-extinction candidate species - Guest Work

Guest Work May 09, 2017

If we are going to resurrect an extinct species, where will it live and what will it eat? Sciblogs is running a series of posts on de-extinction to coincide with a special issue of the journal Functional Ecology focusing on the topic. In this guest post, special issue author Dr Jamie Wood from Landcare Research looks to the past to find answers … Read More

We can do better than Predator Free 2050 - Politecol

- Wayne Linklater May 09, 2017

I have established that Predator Free 2050 (PF2050) is not scientifically rational because it can’t be done and carries with it extraordinary scientific, political and social risks for gains that are less than required to address our nation’s environmental and biodiversity challenges. Instead of PF2050 it would be more sensible, lower risk and increase our chances of sustained biodiversity … Read More