Science and Society

Is this study legit? 5 questions to ask when reading news stories of medical research - Guest Work

Guest Author Oct 11, 2019

Hassan Vally, La Trobe University Who doesn’t want to know if drinking that second or third cup of coffee a day will improve your memory, or if sleeping too much increases your risk of a heart attack? We’re invested in staying healthy and many of us are interested in reading about new research findings to help us make sense of … Read More

Night lights of NZ from orbit - Out of Space

Duncan Steel Oct 10, 2019

New Zealand has prided itself for decades with regard to its lack of pollution, and all will be aware that the ‘100% Pure New Zealand‘ meme is under threat through land, water and air pollution of various causes. There is another type of contamination that the country also faces: light pollution. Astronomers are concerned that the dark skies of … Read More

Why some people still think climate change isn’t real - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Oct 10, 2019

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz Why do people still think climate change isn’t real? David Hall, Auckland University of Technology At its heart, … Read More

Exclusive language - Mind Matters

Michael Corballis Oct 07, 2019

What is language? We generally assume that it a facility unique to humans, allowing us to share what’s in and on our minds. We can tell of our plans, our past exploits, our knowledge. It also allows us to lie. And yet there are vast numbers of people we can’t talk to, because they speak a different language. Speech is … Read More

Google Doodle for Bill Robinson’s birthday - Out of Space

Duncan Steel Oct 02, 2019

The Google Doodle today (at least in New Zealand and Australia) commemorates the birth in 1938 of Bill Robinson, the kiwi scientist who invented the rubber ‘shock absorbers’ that provide some seismic insulation for large buildings, notably under Te Papa in Wellington.  Sometimes a Google Doodle (the cartoon seen when one opens the Google search page) leaves one … Read More

What each of us can do to reduce our carbon footprint - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Oct 02, 2019

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz As an individual, what is the single, most important thing I can do in the face of climate … Read More

Crowded on the Space Station - Out of Space

Duncan Steel Oct 01, 2019

Currently there are nine astronauts in orbit, passing a bit more than 400 km above our heads several times a day. If you would like to watch the Space Station in New Zealand’s skies, there are several opportunities this next week, so long as you don’t mind getting up reasonably early, before sunrise.  Just at the moment it’s fairly crowded … Read More

Rape: Through a glass darkly - Mind Matters

Michael Corballis Oct 01, 2019

The following is a summary notice of a talk given to an academic audience in my university (the author and location shall be nameless): In this paper I seek to uncover law’s ontological force as it reveals itself in the rape trial. It is common for survivors of sexual violence to refer to their interaction with the criminal justice system … Read More

All Blacks take a bath in Beppu - Out of Space

Duncan Steel Sep 28, 2019

The All Blacks are currently resting up in the Japanese spa town of Beppu, awaiting their next game. Like Rotorua and several other spa towns spread around the globe, Beppu has an impact crater on asteroid (951) Gaspra named for it.  Perusing the intellectual pages (i.e. the sports section) in The Press this morning whilst sipping coffee at Yaza! in … Read More