Science and Society

Māori and Pasifika scholars remain severely under-represented in New Zealand universities - Guest Work

Guest Author Sep 02, 2019

Tara McAllister, University of Auckland and Sereana Naepi, Thompson Rivers University The number of Māori and Pasifika students attending New Zealand universities has been increasing steadily, with 75,625 Māori and 32,465 Pasifika enrolled in 2018. But for many of these students, they will not be taught by Māori or Pasifika throughout their degree. And depending … Read More

The options for Hector’s and Māui dolphins - Making Waves

Otago Marine Science Sep 01, 2019

Professor Liz Slooten and Professor Steve Dawson, University of Otago The recently released Threat Management Plan for Hector’s and Maui dolphins presents government’s proposals for better protection from entanglement in fishing nets and other threats. Better options than any in the Threat Management Plan have been recommended by New Zealand and international experts. Worse options have been proposed by … Read More

The fires in Brazil in satellite imagery: Part 1 - Out of Space

Duncan Steel Aug 31, 2019

The numerous fires now burning in Brazil have been much-discussed of late, with world leaders complaining that the nation’s authorities allowing such clearing of land is highly detrimental to international efforts to limit the release of more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, with the potential to exacerbate anthropogenic global warming/climate change. In this post I illustrate how such fires may … Read More

Star laws: what happens if you commit a crime in space? - Guest Work

Guest Author Aug 28, 2019

Danielle Ireland-Piper NASA is reportedly investigating what could be the first ever alleged crime in space. Astronaut Anne McClain has been accused of accessing her estranged spouse’s bank account via the internet while on board the International Space Station (she denies the accusation). This gives rise to the question: what criminal law, if any, applies in outer space? The … Read More

Why is there a rip-roaring measles outbreak in NZ? - Diplomatic Immunity

Helen Petousis Harris Aug 21, 2019

As with many countries around the world, NZ is experiencing the worst measles outbreak in over 20 years. Welcome back to the dark ages. This was predictable,  entirely preventable, and the government were warned. If this outbreak is not stamped out by March next year NZ will lose its hard-earned measles elimination status. There are four reasons for this – … Read More

Why we need to cut emissions as well as prepare for impacts - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Aug 21, 2019

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz First, let’s accept climate change is happening and will have major negative impacts on New Zealand. Second, let’s also … Read More

New Zealand’s environmental parable for a world crisis - Guest Work

Guest Author Aug 19, 2019

Brian Gill The fate of rats on a tiny New Zealand island is a story to retell as the world’s experiment with unlimited growth of human numbers threatens ruin. The world has too many people. As if more than 7,260 million souls are not enough, the population is in the dreaded phase of exponential growth, rocketing uncontrolled and uncontrollably to … Read More

Almonds don’t lactate, but that’s no reason to start calling almond milk juice - Guest Work

Guest Author Aug 07, 2019

Dan Weijers, University of Waikato and Nick Munn, University of Waikato At a conference about disruptive innovations in food production last week, dairy industry spokespeople criticised the “milk” labelling of non-dairy products such as almond or rice milks. Federated Farmers, a rural advocacy group, prompted media headlines with a suggestion that we should call … Read More