Science

Lost in translation or deliberate falsification? - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Apr 26, 2021

I’m staring at an evolutionary tree of New Zealand wrens when ‘damn it Travers’ rings out. The infamous Victorian collector Henry Hamersley Travers had just struck again. In front of me also are the delicate historical skins of some of these tiny wrens, frozen in time since the day they were collected. While some are still with us like the … Read More

The St Vincent eruption is a reminder of how volcano research and monitoring can save lives - News

Guest Author Apr 23, 2021

Silvio De Angelis, University of Liverpool and Janine Kavanagh, University of Liverpool Volcanic eruptions come with a variety of hazards, depending on the type of volcano and its magma. Some have effusive eruptions, where lava flows constantly, while others can expel large clouds of fragments of magma and gases – volcanic ash – into the atmosphere. For some of the … Read More

So a helicopter flew on Mars for the first time. A space physicist explains why that’s such a big deal - News

Guest Author Apr 21, 2021

Gail Iles, RMIT University Yesterday at 9pm Australian Eastern standard time, the Ingenuity helicopter — which landed on Mars with the Perseverance rover in February — took off from the Martian surface. More importantly, it hovered for about 30 seconds, three metres above the surface and came right back down again. It may not sound like a huge … Read More

NZ’s next large Alpine Fault quake is likely coming sooner than we thought, study shows - Hot off the press

Guest Author Apr 20, 2021

Jamie Howarth, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington and Rupert Sutherland, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington The Alpine Fault marks the boundary between the Pacific and Australian plates in the South Island of New Zealand. Author provided The chances of New Zealand’s Alpine Fault rupturing in a damaging earthquake in the next 50 years are … Read More

Climate decisions in a car-reliant country - Unsorted

Marcus Wilson Apr 13, 2021

This is my first post for a while. I have been a bit overwhelmed by other work in the last several weeks, with teaching and other commitments, and the blog has sadly suffered. But I’m still here. This morning, while sitting in a car in the permanent traffic jam through the Waikato Expressway roadworks south of Hamilton, I was reflecting … Read More

Climate explained: rising carbon emissions (probably) won’t make the Earth uninhabitable - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Apr 07, 2021

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz Even with all humanity’s carbon emissions to date, there’s a lot less carbon dioxide in Earth’s atmosphere … Read More

Chocolate’s secret ingredient is the fermenting microbes that make it taste so good - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 05, 2021

Caitlin Clark, Colorado State University Whether baked as chips into a cookie, melted into a sweet warm drink or molded into the shape of a smiling bunny, chocolate is one of the world’s most universally consumed foods. Even the biggest chocolate lovers, though, might not recognize what this ancient food has in common with kimchi and kombucha: its flavors … Read More

Five ways fish are more like humans than you realise - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 01, 2021

Matt Parker, University of Portsmouth You’ve probably heard that fish have a three-second memory, or that they’re incapable of feeling pain. Neither of these statements is true, but it’s telling that these misconceptions don’t crop up for other vertebrates. Perhaps it’s because fish appear so different from us. They don’t seem to have any capacity for facial expression, … Read More

Shorter stays in the ED thanks to COVID-19 - Kidney Punch

John Pickering Mar 29, 2021

Early last year the expected influx of patients with COVID-19 to emergency departments (ED) in New Zealand required rapid preparation.  Many questions needed answering quickly – such as, where will we put all the patients? How will we separate highly likely COVID-19 patients from less likely COVID-19 patients?  How will we allocate staff and keep them safe? One of the two most … Read More

How particles ejected from the Sun affect Earth’s climate - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Mar 24, 2021

  Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz When the Sun ejects solar particles into space, how does this affect the Earth and … Read More