Science

Chocolate’s secret ingredient is the fermenting microbes that make it taste so good - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 05, 2021

Caitlin Clark, Colorado State University Whether baked as chips into a cookie, melted into a sweet warm drink or molded into the shape of a smiling bunny, chocolate is one of the world’s most universally consumed foods. Even the biggest chocolate lovers, though, might not recognize what this ancient food has in common with kimchi and kombucha: its flavors … Read More

Five ways fish are more like humans than you realise - Guest Work

Guest Author Apr 01, 2021

Matt Parker, University of Portsmouth You’ve probably heard that fish have a three-second memory, or that they’re incapable of feeling pain. Neither of these statements is true, but it’s telling that these misconceptions don’t crop up for other vertebrates. Perhaps it’s because fish appear so different from us. They don’t seem to have any capacity for facial expression, … Read More

Shorter stays in the ED thanks to COVID-19 - Kidney Punch

John Pickering Mar 29, 2021

Early last year the expected influx of patients with COVID-19 to emergency departments (ED) in New Zealand required rapid preparation.  Many questions needed answering quickly – such as, where will we put all the patients? How will we separate highly likely COVID-19 patients from less likely COVID-19 patients?  How will we allocate staff and keep them safe? One of the two most … Read More

How particles ejected from the Sun affect Earth’s climate - Climate: Explained

Guest Author Mar 24, 2021

  Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change. If you have a question you’d like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz When the Sun ejects solar particles into space, how does this affect the Earth and … Read More

Following 3 major quakes off New Zealand, questions remain about how they might be linked - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 08, 2021

Timothy Stern, Te Herenga Waka — Victoria University of Wellington A sequence of three major offshore earthquakes, including a magnitude 8.1 quake near the Kermadec Islands, triggered tsunami warnings and evacuations along the east coast of New Zealand on the morning of March 5. The Tonga Kermadec subduction zone stretches between New Zealand and south of Samoa. USGS, … Read More

As the Perseverance rover lands on Mars, there’s a lot we already know about the red planet from meteorites found on Earth - News

Guest Author Feb 19, 2021

James Scott, University of Otago NASA’s Perseverance rover successfully touched down on Mars this morning, and has already begun beaming back images. Hello, world. My first look at my forever home. #CountdownToMars pic.twitter.com/dkM9jE9I6X — NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover (@NASAPersevere) February 18, 2021 But people might be surprised to learn … Read More

The Fukushima quake may be an echo of the 2011 disaster — and a warning for the future - News

Guest Author Feb 16, 2021

Mark Quigley, University of Melbourne A 7.1 magnitude earthquake was recorded off the coast of Fukushima Prefecture in northeastern Japan on Saturday night, injuring around 100 people, closing roads and trains, and leaving almost a million people without electricity overnight. It came almost 10 years after the nearby Tohoku quake of March 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake … Read More

New Year of Ocean Mapping, Two Voyages Aboard the R/V Falkor - Field Work

Guest Author Feb 10, 2021

Alysha Johnson Tēnā koutou! My name is Alysha Johnson, and I am a PhD student at the University of Wollongong studying the geomorphic evolution of volcanic islands, seamounts and guyots. I was lucky enough to join the crew and scientists aboard the R/V Falkor with Schmidt Ocean Institute on their ‘Pinging in the New Year’ expedition running from 28th December … Read More