Guest Work

Take it from me: neuroscience is advancing, but we’re a long way off head transplants

Guest Work May 07, 2018

Lyndsey Collins-Praino, University of Adelaide In the 1983 film The Man with Two Brains, Steve Martin’s character falls in love with the disembodied brain of a woman named Anne. But what once sat in the realm of movies and science fiction novels now seems slightly more plausible. Recent advances in neuroscience have lead to human cells being … Read More

How artificial intelligence can detect – and create – fake news

Guest Work May 06, 2018

Anjana Susarla, Michigan State University When Mark Zuckerberg told Congress Facebook would use artificial intelligence to detect fake news posted on the social media site, he wasn’t particularly specific about what that meant. Given my own work using image and video analytics, I suggest the company should be careful. Despite some basic potential flaws, AI can … Read More

I watched an entire Flat Earth Convention for my research – here’s what I learnt

Guest Work May 05, 2018

Harry T Dyer, University of East Anglia Speakers recently flew in from around (or perhaps, across?) the earth for a three-day event held in Birmingham: the UK’s first ever public Flat Earth Convention. It was well attended, and wasn’t just three days of speeches and YouTube clips (though, granted, there was a lot of this). There was … Read More

Our soils: more than meets the (developer’s) eye

Guest Work May 04, 2018

Pierre Roudier With a title like “Precious arable land”, needless to say, I’ve read with interest Eric Crampton’s opinion piece published on Sciblogs recently. It followed the release of Our Land 2018, the Ministry for the Environment’s report about the state of New Zealand’s land resources. One of the main outcomes of this report is the impact of … Read More

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From #MeToo to #RiceBunny: how social media users are campaigning in China

Guest Work May 03, 2018

Meg Jing Zeng, Queensland University of Technology This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Rice bunny says, “the only thing I want for the coming Lunar New Year is anti-sexual harassment rulings… You can take my plate away, but you cannot shut my mouth.” So reads the opening line of a … Read More

DNA facial prediction could make protecting your privacy more difficult

Guest Work May 03, 2018

Caitlin Curtis, The University of Queensland and James Hereward, The University of Queensland This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Technologies for amplifying, sequencing and matching DNA have created new opportunities in genomic science. In this series When DNA Talks we look at the ethical and social implications. Everywhere … Read More

Six ways to improve water quality in New Zealand’s lakes and rivers

Guest Work May 02, 2018

Troy Baisden, University of Waikato This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Two years ago, New Zealanders were shocked when contaminated drinking water sickened more than 5,000 people in the small town of Havelock North, with a population of 14,000. A government inquiry found that sheep faeces were the … Read More

AI can help in crime prevention, but we still need a human in charge

Guest Work May 01, 2018

David Tuffley, Griffith University Imagine you live in a smart city that knows your face and follows your every move – the places you go, the people you see, and all of the things you do along the way. Over time, autonomous artificial intelligence (AI) builds a profile that reports on how likely you are to commit a … Read More

How plastic-eating bacteria actually work – a chemist explains

Guest Work May 01, 2018

Emily Flashman, Research Fellow in Enzymology, University of Oxford This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The plastic bottles we throw away today will be around for hundreds of years. It’s one of the key reasons why the mounting plastic pollution problem, which is having a deadly effect on … Read More

Launching in May, the InSight mission will measure marsquakes to explore the interior of Mars

Guest Work Apr 30, 2018

Katarina Miljkovic, Curtin University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. When we look up at Mars in the night sky we see a red planet – largely due to its rusty surface. But what’s on the inside? Launching in May, the next NASA space mission will study the interior … Read More