Guest Work

Drones and wildlife – working to co-exist

Guest Work Sep 12, 2017

By Pip Wallace, University of Waikato; Iain White, University of Waikato, and Ross Martin, University of Waikato The drone market is booming and it is changing the way we use airspace, with some unforeseen consequences. The uptake of remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs) has been swift. But despite their obvious benefits, concerns are growing about … Read More

Massive sunspots and huge solar flares mean unexpected space weather for Earth

Guest Work Sep 08, 2017

By Alexa Halford, Dartmouth College; Brett Carter, RMIT University, and Julie Currie, RMIT University If you still have your solar viewing glasses from the eclipse, now is a good time to slap them on and look up at the sun. You’ll see two big dark areas visible on our star. These massive sunspots are … Read More

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New Zealand’s fisheries quota management system: on an undeserved pedestal

Guest Work Sep 05, 2017

By Glenn Simmons; Bruce Robertson; (David) Hugh Whittaker, University of Oxford; Elisabeth Slooten; Fiona McCormack, University of Waikato; Graeme Bremner; Nigel Haworth; Simon Francis Thrush, and Steve Dawson In popular imagination, New Zealand’s fisheries management system is a globally recognised story of sustainability, reflecting a “clean and green” environmental … Read More

At last! The world’s first ethical guidelines for driverless cars

Guest Work Sep 04, 2017

By David Tuffley, Griffith University Humans before animals and property. No discrimination as to who should survive. Safeguards against malicious hacking. These are just some of the world-first ethical rules being implemented in Germany regarding how autonomous vehicles are to be programmed. The federal transport minister Alexander Dobrindt presented a report on automated driving to Germany’s cabinet … Read More

How to make robots that we can trust

Guest Work Aug 30, 2017

By Prof Michael Winikoff, University of Otago Self-driving cars, personal assistants, cleaning robots, smart homes – these are just some examples of autonomous systems. With many such systems already in use or under development, a key question concerns trust. My central argument is that having trustworthy, well-working systems is not enough. To enable trust, the design of autonomous systems … Read More

100% renewable by 2050: the technology already exists to make it happen

Guest Work Aug 25, 2017

By Dénes Csala, Lancaster University and Sgouris Sgouridis, Masdar Institute Most of the world could switch to 100% renewable energy by 2050, creating millions of jobs, saving millions of lives that would otherwise be lost to air pollution, and avoiding 1.5℃ of warming. That’s the bold claim of a major new study by Stanford professor Mark … Read More

Antarctic ice reveals that fossil fuel extraction leaks more methane than thought

Guest Work Aug 24, 2017

By Hinrich Schaefer, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric The fossil fuel industry is a larger contributor to atmospheric methane levels than previously thought, according to our research which shows that natural seepage of this potent greenhouse gas from oil and gas reservoirs is more modest than had been assumed. In our research, published in Nature today, … Read More

Friend or foe? Just look at the way a person moves

Guest Work Aug 22, 2017

By Kylie Steel, Western Sydney University Ever had that funny feeling about someone you don’t know who’s approaching you? There’s something about them that makes you feel uneasy or you think they could cause you harm. Scientific evidence indicates this is more than just learned behaviour: it’s a survival strategy, and something we are born with. But could … Read More

When artists get involved in research, science benefits

Guest Work Aug 17, 2017

By Craig Stevens and Gabby O’Connor When artists and scientists get together, creative sparks can fly. Collaborative sci-art projects are increasingly popular and one obvious benefit is the greater visibility of the research through the artist’s work. Our project explored scientific and artistic aspects of Antarctic ice crystals. But what’s in it for the … Read More