Guest Work

Costly signals needed to deliver inconvenient truth

Guest Work Aug 16, 2017

By Quentin Douglas Atkinson and Shaun Hendy A little over half the world’s population sees climate change as a serious problem (54% according to a 40-nation Pew Research survey). Coincidentally, roughly the same number identify as Christian or Muslim (55%). On the one hand, these statistics speak to the success of climate change communication. In just … Read More

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Cows in Antarctica? How one expedition milked them for all their worth

Guest Work Aug 14, 2017

By Hanne E.F. Nielsen, University of Tasmania and Elizabeth Leane, University of Tasmania Domestic animals are rarely associated with Antarctica. However, before non-native species (bar humans) were excluded from the continent in the 1990s, many travelled to the far south. These animals included not only the obvious sledge dogs, but also ponies, sheep, … Read More

Nicotine in sports: high use but little evidence of effects on performance

Guest Work Aug 10, 2017

By Toby Mündel, Massey University When you think nicotine, you probably think of smokers, addiction, carcinogens and disease – not elite athletes and sporting performance. However, our research published today shows that the use of nicotine among athletes is high and increasing. In some sports, up to half the team uses nicotine in various forms, mostly as … Read More

Reengineering elevators could transform 21st-century cities

Guest Work Aug 09, 2017

By Antony Wood, Illinois Institute of Technology and Dario Trabucco, Università Iuav di Venezia In the 160 or so years since the first skyscrapers were built, technological innovations of many kinds have allowed us to build them to reach astonishing heights. Today there is a 1,000-meter (167-story) building under construction in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Even … Read More

Our healthcare records outlive us. It’s time to decide what happens to the data once we’re gone.

Guest Work Aug 07, 2017

By Jon Cornwall, Victoria University of Wellington Death is inevitable. The creation of healthcare records about every complaint and ailment we seek treatment for is also a near-certainty. Data about patients is a vital cog in the provision of efficient health services. Our study explores what happens to those healthcare records after you die. We focus on … Read More

Solar is now the most popular form of new electricity generation worldwide

Guest Work Aug 03, 2017

By Andrew Blakers, Australian National University Solar has become the world’s favourite new type of electricity generation, according to global data showing that more solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity is being installed than any other generation technology. Worldwide, some 73 gigawatts of net new solar PV capacity was installed in 2016. Wind energy came in second place (55GW), … Read More

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Climate change set to increase air pollution deaths by hundreds of thousands by 2100

Guest Work Aug 02, 2017

By Guang Zeng, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research and Jason West, University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill Climate change is set to increase the amount of ground-level ozone and fine particle pollution we breathe, which leads to lung disease, heart conditions, and stroke. Less rain and more heat means this pollution will stay … Read More

Huge drop in men’s sperm levels confirmed by new study – here are the facts

Guest Work Jul 31, 2017

By Chris Barratt, University of Dundee Sperm count in men from North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand declined by 50-60% between 1973 and 2011, according to a new study from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Surprisingly, the study, which analysed data on the sperm counts of 42,935 men, found no decline in sperm counts … Read More

Why are only some viruses transmissible by blood and how are they actually spread?

Guest Work Jul 28, 2017

David Griffin, The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity and Thomas Schulz, The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity Since the 1980s, most of us have been aware we need to be careful when coming into contact with the blood of others, because some viruses can be transmitted in this way. But why is … Read More

Supreme Court ruling on NZ’s largest irrigation dam proposal respects conservation law and protected land

Guest Work Jul 28, 2017

Christine Cheyne, Massey University Earlier this month, New Zealand’s Supreme Court rejected a proposed land swap that would have flooded conservation land for the construction of the country’s largest irrigation dam. The court was considering whether the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council’s investment arm could build a dam on 22 hectares of the protected Ruahine Forest Park in … Read More

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