Guest Work

Flu vaccine won’t definitely stop you from getting the flu, but it’s more important than you think

Guest Work Apr 14, 2017

Allen Cheng, Monash University and Kristine Macartney, University of Sydney As we head towards a southern hemisphere winter, many people are wondering if it’s worth getting the flu vaccine. Generally speaking, if you are vaccinated, you’re less likely to get the flu. But that’s not the whole story. For most healthy people, it’s … Read More

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Enzymes versus nerve agents: Designing antidotes for chemical weapons

Guest Work Apr 12, 2017

By  Ian Haydon, University of Washington A chemical weapons attack that killed more than 80 people, including children, triggered the Trump administration’s recent missile strikes against the Syrian government. The use of illegal nerve agents – apparently by the Assad regime – violated international law; President Trump said he was moved to act … Read More

How scientists should communicate their work in a post-truth era

Guest Work Apr 04, 2017

By Andy Miah, University of Salford It’s not an easy time for scientists to talk to the wider public. The US president, Donald Trump, has called global warming “bullshit” and a “Chinese hoax”. In the UK, leave campaigner and MP Michael Gove famously declared that people “have had enough of experts”. But now UK MPs have published … Read More

New study shows HPV vaccine is working to reduce rates of genital warts

Guest Work Mar 30, 2017

By Dave Hawkes, University of Melbourne The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was introduced in Australia in 2007 and New Zealand in 2008 to prevent cervical cancer. It was free for women up to age 26 in Australia and to all women under 20 in New Zealand. This is because 99.7% of cervical cancers are associated with the sexually transmissible … Read More

Three rivers are now legally people – but that’s just the start of looking after them

Guest Work Mar 29, 2017

By Erin O’Donnell, University of Melbourne and Julia Talbot-Jones, Australian National University In the space of a week, the world has gained three notable new legal persons: the Whanganui River in New Zealand, and the Ganga and Yamuna Rivers in India. In New Zealand, the government passed legislation that recognised the Whanganui River catchment … Read More

New Zealand quake study reveals ruptures can be much bigger than we thought possible

Guest Work Mar 27, 2017

By Stephen Hicks, University of Southampton No one could have expected what was to hit New Zealand in 2016. The country is certainly no stranger to being shaken up by moving tectonic plates. Yet on November 14 2016, it was struck by what may be the most complex rupture ever recorded, overshadowing even the highly destructive sequence of … Read More

Nose evolution shaped by climate

John Kerr Mar 17, 2017

Your nose looks the way it does thanks, in part, to the climate where your ancient ancestors lived, finds new research. The new study, published today in PLOS Genetics, explores the evolutionary history of the nose, focusing on one specific question: “Has climate adaptation played an important role in influencing variation in human nose shape?” The human nose conditions the temperature and … Read More

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