Guest Work

How does the hypothalamus control ageing?

Guest Work Jul 28, 2017

Richard Faragher, University of Brighton If you are reading this and you don’t smoke, then your major risk factor for dying is probably your age. That’s because we have nearly eliminated mortality in early life, thanks to advances in science and engineering. But despite this progress, we still haven’t worked out how to eliminate the damaging effects … Read More

What can go wrong in the blood?

Guest Work Jul 27, 2017

Maher Gandhi, The University of Queensland and Huyen Tran, Monash University While blood is essential for human life, there are many things that can go wrong. And as it travels around the body and flows through every organ, problems in the blood can have wide-ranging implications for our health. There are countless problems that can occur … Read More

Why looking for aliens is good for society (even if there aren’t any)

Guest Work Jul 27, 2017

Ian Crawford, UCL The search for life elsewhere in the universe is one of the most compelling aspects of modern science. Given its scientific importance, significant resources are devoted to this young science of astrobiology, ranging from rovers on Mars to telescopic observations of planets orbiting other stars. The holy grail of all this activity would be … Read More

The next pharmaceutical revolution could be 3D bioprinted

Guest Work Jul 26, 2017

Aurelien Forget, Queensland University of Technology and Tim Dargaville, Queensland University of Technology Body organs such as kidneys, livers and hearts are incredibly complex tissues. Each is made up of many different cell types, plus other components that give the organs their structure and allow them to function as we need them to. For 3D printed … Read More

Three ways the Charlie Gard case could affect future end-of-life cases globally

Guest Work Jul 26, 2017

Neera Bhatia, Deakin University The tragic case of Charlie Gard, the British infant whose parents have just ended their legal fight to send him to the US for experimental treatment, has captured global attention. The case is significant for a number of reasons, both in the huge amount of publicity it has attracted, its progression … Read More

Hugs, drugs and choices: helping traumatised animals

Guest Work Jul 25, 2017

David John Roland, University of Sydney Rosie, like a real-life Babe, ran away from an organic piggery when she was only a few days old. She was found wandering in a car park, highly agitated, by a family who took her home and made her their live-in pet. However, after three months they could no longer keep … Read More

Why apartment dwellers need indoor plants

Guest Work Jul 25, 2017

Danica-Lea Larcombe, Edith Cowan University The number of Australians living in high-rise apartments doubled between 1991 and 2011 and that trend has continued since then. The quarter-acre dream is fast disappearing and larger blocks and family gardens along with it. As more people move from country areas to the city and as land to build homes near … Read More

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How our immune system causes heart disease

Guest Work Jul 24, 2017

Rahul Kurup, Heart Research Institute Heart disease is among the leading causes of death globally and imposes a significant burden on the health-care system. We know some of the causes of heart disease: smoking, unhealthy diet, obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and genes. But there are also a lot of people who die from heart … Read More

Trading biodiversity: gains and risks

Guest Work Jul 21, 2017

Dr John Leathwick Two weeks ago, a vigorous debate was generated by the Supreme Court’s confirmation of a decision striking down the Department of Conservation’s plan to swap conservation land for private land to facilitate construction of the proposed Ruataniwha Dam in Hawke’s Bay. Much of this debate centred on whether biodiversity gains can be achieved through such trades. Conflicting … Read More

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