Lighting up Wellington’s waterfront

By Siouxsie Wiles 31/08/2014


For the last week, Wellington has been positively glowing thanks to the lux festival. This year I collaborated with artist Brittany Byrne to bring a touch of bioluminescence to the proceedings – rather appropriate given the genes that encode bacterial bioluminescence are known as the lux operon.

Previously Brittany created Nimbus – a work involving hundreds, if not thousands, of wooden pegs, suspended in the air and which made a very satisfying sound when touched.

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/78046227[/vimeo]

Our piece was called Vibrio Nimbus, and from the outside looked like a boring old shipping containing.

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But on the inside, Nimbus’ wooden pegs had been replaced with hundreds of plastic conical tubes and the sonic nature of Brittany’s previous work exchanged for light, provided by trillions of glowing bacteria. When the tubes were gently jostled, they glowed a little brighter for a brief time, thanks to the little extra oxygen being supplied. Here’s a picture I took – Vibrio Nimbus was a bit like bringing one of Waitomo’s glow worm caves to the Wellington waterfront.

vibrio nimbus

A huge thanks has to go to the Bioluminescent Superbugs Lab and Una Ren for preparing all the media needed to keep Vibrio Nimbus glowing – the bacteria needed replacing with a fresh batch every other day. Brittany and her team became quite adept at growing microbes this week! And if you need reminding about the glowing Vibrio and where it is normally found, check out the Astrosquid animation below.