Infrequently Asked Questions

Mosquito-borne diseases more likely to reach New Zealand

Lynley Hargreaves Nov 02, 2017

It’s a familiar New Zealand story, the havoc wrecked by all the pest species we’ve brought in. But in the case of mosquitoes, the worst might be yet to come. There were 12 mostly bird-nibbling mosquito species in pre-European times. Since our arrival, three new species have become permanently established here. We’ve stopped dozens more at our … Read More

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Future Medicine: Organising Human Brain Cells on a Silicon Chip

Lynley Hargreaves Sep 13, 2017

Forget petri dishes: a team from the University of Auckland is using a Royal Society Te Apārangi Marsden Fund grant to organise human neural cells into grids. The group then stimulate the cells with electrodes, to better understand real communication in the brain and to mimic the effects of common neurological conditions such as epilepsy and stroke. Associate Professor Charles … Read More

Take a walk on the polluted side: air pollutant exposure on busy roads

Lynley Hargreaves Sep 01, 2017

Originally posted on Royal Society Te Apārangi’s Past and Future series where, as part of 150th anniversary celebrations, early career researchers are invited to share discoveries in their fields from days gone by or give us a glimpse into where their research may take us in the future. By Dr Lena Francesca Weissert, Research Fellow in Chemical Sciences at University … Read More

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Matters of coincidence or the collective digital unconscious?

Lynley Hargreaves Aug 18, 2017

Originally posted on Royal Society Te Apārangi’s Past and Future series where, as part of 150th anniversary celebrations, early career researchers are invited to share discoveries in their fields from days gone by or give us a glimpse into where their research may take us in the future. By Dr Markus Luczak-Roesch, senior lecturer from the School of Information Management … Read More

Investigating homicide in mental health services

Guest Work Jul 20, 2017

Originally posted on Royal Society Te Apārangi’s Past and Future series where, as part of 150th anniversary celebrations, early career researchers are invited to share discoveries in their fields from days gone by or give us a glimpse into where their research may take us in the future. By Lillian Ng, Department of Psychological Medicine, The University of Auckland In … Read More

Curiouser and Curiouser: The mysterious incidence of testicular cancer in Māori

Lynley Hargreaves Jun 15, 2017

Originally posted on Royal Society Te Apārangi’s Past and Future series where, as part of 150th anniversary celebrations, early career researchers are invited to share discoveries in their fields from days gone by or give us a glimpse into where their research may take us in the future. By Jason Gurney, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, … Read More

The Royal Society, 150 years on

Lynley Hargreaves Apr 06, 2017

There’s a common thread running through the 150 year history of the Royal Society Te Apārangi. That is the Society’s ability to reinvent itself, says historian John Martin, who wrote the book Illuminating our World: 150 Years of the Royal Society Te Apārangi launched in Wellington last night. The Society’s latest reconception, in some ways, takes the organisation back to its … Read More

Kaka, cognition and how bird brains help us understand intelligence

Lynley Hargreaves Mar 23, 2017

Dr Rachael Shaw Bird brain shouldn’t be an insult anymore, says Victoria University Research Fellow Dr Rachael Shaw, because birds can do amazing things. Dr Shaw studied the cognition of a population of curious robins in Wellington’s Zealandia ecosanctuary with a Fast-Start Marsden Fund grant. Together with students, she has since found these birds may be able … Read More