Cheesecake files: Just how deadly is it?

By John Pickering 27/11/2014


Everyone said it did, but how did they know and by how much?  Statements like

“The development of AKI [Acute Kidney Injury] after CPB [Cardiopulmonary Bypass Surgery] is associated with a significant increase in infectious complications, an increase in length of hospital stay, and greater mortality.” (Kumar & Suneja, Anaesthesiology 2011 14(4):964)

are common place in the acute kidney injury literature.  When I started to look at the references for such statements I realised that they were all to individual, normally single centre, studies and that the estimates of the increased risk associated with AKI after CPB varied considerably.  Furthermore, the way AKI is defined in these studies is quite varied. This lead to two questions?

  1. Just how deadly is getting AKI after CPB?
  2. Does it matter how we define AKI in this case?

These questions are important as the answer to them helps a surgeon and patient to better assess the risk associated with choosing to have cardiopulmonary bypass surgery and what the importance is in monitoring kidney function after such a surgery.  To answer these questions required a meta-analysis the results of which I have just published (a.k.a earned a cheesecake).  A meta-analysis involves systematically searching through the literature, a sentence which takes seconds to write but months to serve, for all articles reporting an association between AKI and mortality after CPB.  Then there is learning how to put all the, sometimes disparate, data together (I had to learn a lot of R for this one) and to report on it.  As this was my first meta-analysis, I was fortunate to have the assistance of two highly competent scientists & nephrologists with meta-analysis experience, namely Dr’s Matt James of Calgary, and Suetonia Palmer of my own department in the University of Otago Christchurch.

So – what did we find?

  1. If you get AKI after CPB you about 4 time more likely to die compared to if you do not get AKI after CPB even after accounting for things like age, diabetes, and other risk factors.
  2. Somewhere between 37 and 118 lives per 10,000 CPB operations could be saved if we could find a way to eliminate AKI.
  3. How AKI was measured did not make any difference to the results.
  4. AKI after CPB was also associated with increased risk of stroke.
Figure 1 from Pickering et al, AJKD 2014
A teaser of a figure from Pickering et al, AJKD 2014

Pickering, J. W., James, M. T., & Palmer, S. C. (2014). Acute Kidney Injury and Prognosis after Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Meta-analysis of Cohort Studies. American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation. doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2014.09.008

ps. Sorry about the paywall folks, but as I’ve said before, if we want to put this data in front of the people it is most relevant to we haven’t the budget to always make them Open Access.

 

Tagged: Acute Kidney Injury, Acute Renal Failure, AJKD, AKI, Cardiac Surgery, Cardiopulmonary Bypass, CPB, death, Dialysis, Kidney, RRT