Red, Red Wine

By Jim McVeagh 12/01/2012 1


A researcher into the benefits of resveratrol, the ingredient in red wine that is thought to have cardiovascular benefits, has been found to be falsifying his results. Dr. Dipak Das is alleged to have fabricated, falsified and manipulated data for several minor published studies of the substance.

This is a little weird in itself because there is no need to falsify data for resveratrol. There are plenty of studies that indicate its benefits, so there is none of the pressure that comes from wanting to justify a new drug. One presumes that Das falsified his data just because he was too lazy to redo his experiment (or perhaps even do it at all).

This sort of behaviour is not merely a nuisance and an embarassment. In the eyes of the public, it throws all of the research on resveratrol into doubt. Hence the rather terse assessment from another researcher:

But Dr Nir Barzilai, whose research team conducts resveratrol research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, told The Associated Press that Das is not a major figure in the field.

The new allegations will not make a material difference to resveratrol research, which is being conducted extensively around the world with encouraging results from many labs, Barzilai said.

I suspect Dr. Barzilai realises that Das’ antics have made it just that little bit harder to get funding for resveratrol research. If it is any consolation, the MacDoctor still thinks the stuff is great and will be having a glass of red wine with his meal tonight. His heart is good…

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One Response to “Red, Red Wine”

  • “This is a little weird in itself because there is no need to falsify data for resveratrol. There are plenty of studies that indicate its benefits,”

    Others suggest otherwise.

    Perhaps you might back your statement? Or at least counter the points this writer makes. (I believe his points are similar to ones you’ve made on products you disfavour.)