The "Yuck" Factor wastes $35,000 US

By Michael Edmonds 05/07/2011 8


In Portland USA, an eight million gallon water reservoir was drained after a young man was seen urinating in it. Given that the water official interviewed freely admits that they don’t empty the reservoir when dead animals are found in it these seem like a bit of an over-reaction. His explanation for draining the reservoir was because of the yuck factor.

Quite frankly, for me the “Yuck” factor from a dead animal is far stronger than the idea of of small amount of urine being present. Urine is generally considered to be relatively sterile, made up largely of water and containing mainly urea and dissolved salts.

Of course, if they could have worked out some way to shake the reservoir they could have had 8 million gallons of homeopathic solution – though it would require further dilution before it was “strong” enough to use.


8 Responses to “The "Yuck" Factor wastes $35,000 US”

  • Would a Mag 6.5 quake do??? But the homeopathetic effect is lost because it has been touched by a human hand isn’t it?? Its about a 4C dilution……weak. It needs dumping ‘cos it wasn’t done right.

  • Ross,

    That the homeopathic “effect” is lost when a human hand touches it is news to me. Could you elaborate further. Is it only hands? What happens when it touches the lips, the tongue etc?

  • I recall a few years ago a friend right into homeopathy telling me to make sure I did not touch the pill she was about to give me. Cos it lost it’s potency if I touched it. After that one I knew who really was touched.

  • Well well well, what’s this?:
    “Of course, if they could have worked out some way to shake the reservoir they could have had 8 million gallons of homeopathic solution – though it would require further dilution before it was “strong” enough to use.”

    A dig at that old Homeopathy….again, eh? My goodness, for a totally ridiculous system of medicine that is quackery, has nothing in it and is mere “placebo” you do seem to spend an inordinate amount of time, as in every conceivable opportunity, to make some negative statement against it. Did the reservoir contain distilled water? No? Oh, so sorry then, your statement was incorrect as well as uncalled for.

    Grasping at straws to attack Homeopathy whenever possible is not the attitude of someone convinced it is nonsense. It is an attitude of fear, as in fear that it might actually work. Which of your fears is greater? That it might work, or that the principles upon which it might depend to might work remain undiscovered? Or…. is that old elitism kicking in again in which you want to get the “message” to the “unwashed” masses that they need you to help them think? Which is is?

  • ScepticsBane,

    Michael remark about homeopathy was, but pop into a pharmacy and spot the shelf of the stuff & you’d see why it’s worth knocking on the head. You say it’s “a totally ridiculous system of medicine that is quackery, has nothing in it and is mere “placebo”” – true, so why is it in pharmacies, etc.?

  • ScepticsBane,

    Yes, a small dig at homeopathy, however, I would hardly call one sentence in an article on a different subject as spending “an inordinate amount of time, as in every conceivable opportunity, to make some negative statement against it.”
    You are very sensitive aren’t you?