News

Looking for human-nature connections in seasonal Wikipedia searches

Guest Author Mar 29, 2019

Caitlin McDonough MacKenzie Recently, I was wrapping up some revisions on a phenology paper and to comply with the journal’s style for taxonomy, I needed to know the authority on a species of white violets that a Maine hunting guide had noted in his diaries in the mid-twentieth century. Obviously, I turned to Wikipedia. Ecologists who study phenology (or anything!) … Read More

Who spread fake news during the 2016 US election, and whose responsibility is it to stop them?

Annika Bess Feb 01, 2019

“Fake news.” Trump drawled during the led up to the 2016 election. You’re probably tired of hearing the phrase, yet he was right; fake news is a concerning issue, but who is its audience? The 2016 US presidential election was fraught with cries of ‘fake news’. As the term was used from almost all political leanings, the question remains: who … Read More

Returning to a sunken ship

Annika Bess Jan 09, 2019

In 1916, Frank Worsley navigated a lifeboat for 16 days through rough Antarctic waters with the almost impossible task of reaching help over 1000km away, then turned around, this time with a rescue team, to return to his fellow sailors who were still stranded. Frank Worsley. Supplied/Canterbury Museum 1981.110.91. Akaroa-born Worsley was the Captain of the Endurance during Sir … Read More

Two years on from the Kaikōura quake

Guest Author Nov 14, 2018

This week marks the second anniversary of the magnitude 7.8 Kaikōura earthquake that ruptured a world record 25 faults in the upper South Island. GNS Science reflects on some of the key features and implications of this complex event – and talks to principal scientist Dr Kelvin Berryman about what we’ve learned. It was New Zealand’s most comprehensively recorded earthquake. Read More

GMOs, a nod to Nigel the gannet, and illustrated abstracts – our favourite journalism from September

Rachel Thomas Oct 01, 2018

There’s a lot of media out there, and we know it can be hard to keep track of the things you want to read, watch and listen to. We’ve rounded up some of our favourite science-related stories from last month to help you out. If you’ve seen something great that’s not here, let us know in the comments. Read More

Pruitt Resigns Amid Perpetual Scandal. Science Still Likely to Suffer at EPA

Guest Author Jul 07, 2018

Tom Zeller Jr. The latest weekly news roundup from Undark: EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt resigns, hybrid rhino embryos spark hope, and more. It was a Tweet from President Trump that environmental organizations, many scientists, and no shortage of flabbergasted citizens had actually been yearning for: “I have accepted the resignation of Scott Pruitt as the Administrator … Read More

Is your genome really your own? The public and forensic value of DNA

Guest Author May 02, 2018

Nathan Scudder, University of Canberra and Dennis McNevin, University of Technology Sydney This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Technologies for amplifying, sequencing and matching DNA have created new opportunities in genomic science. In this series When DNA Talks we look at the ethical and social implications. When Joseph … Read More

Thanks Mum and Dad! Reef fish inherit tolerance to warming oceans

Jean Balchin May 02, 2018

Recent research published in Nature Climate Change has found that reef fish can inherit from their parents the genetic tools to adjust to warming oceans. Obviously, given that our climate is rapidly changing, the decline of animal populations – particularly marine populations – is a distinct concern. For the first time, researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral … Read More

Moderate to severe mid-life anxiety may be linked to later life dementia

Jean Balchin May 02, 2018

An analysis of the available published evidence in the online journal BMJ Open suggests that moderate to severe mid-life anxiety may be linked to dementia in later life. However, it remains unclear as to whether active treatment could curb this risk. Moreover, the degree to which non-drug therapies such as meditation and mindfulness that reduce anxiety might help is unknown also. Read More

Is it ethical to grow brain tissue?

Jean Balchin Apr 27, 2018

In this week’s Nature, there is an intriguing op-ed about the ethics of growing or sustaining human brain tissue. We must consider the fact that researchers one day might be able to create a model in the laboratory that may be capable of what might appear to be conscious experiences. If this were to happen, it would raise a number of … Read More