By Ken Perrott 13/08/2015


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Paul Connett, Executive Director of the Fluoride Action Network recently made a presentation to Dever Water opposing community Water Fluoridation (CWF). Many of his claims were just wrong – he seriously distorted the science and used this to misinform the board members.

I am posting a series of articles debunking his claims. But Daniel Ryan from Making Sense of Fluoride has also entered the fray with his article Dr Connett distorts the Dunedin IQ fluoride study. I urge readers to check out the article.

Daniel is debunking claims made by Connett about the New Zealand research paper:

Broadbent, J. M., Thomson, W. M., Ramrakha, S., Moffitt, T. E., Zeng, J., Foster Page, L. A., & Poulton, R. (2014). Community Water Fluoridation and Intelligence: Prospective Study in New Zealand. American Journal of Public Health, 105(1), 72–76.

That study is a thorn in Connett’s side because it completely refutes his claims that CWF causes a drop in IQ. It is an excellent paper (as well as being a New Zealand one) – which is another thorn in Connett’s side as he relies on poor quality studies made in areas of endemic fluorosis for his claims.

Daniel goes through Connett’s assertions about the New Zealand study and debunks each of them in turn.

The Broadbent et al. (2014) study investigated a situation where low fluoride concentrations were used. It is the only in-depth study of IQ at these low concentrations. However, I did make a brief investigation of the situation in the USA comparing the average IQ for each state with the percentage fluoridation coverage of the population in each state. I reported that in IQ not influenced by water fluoridation.

The figure below shows the data – and there is no statistically significant correlation of IQ with CWF (the dotted lines show the 95% confidence boundaries)..

Connett debunked once again.

See also:

Connett misrepresents the fluoride and IQ data yet again
Fluoridation: Connett’s naive use of WHO data debunked

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