Tagged: Antarctica

Ancient ancestors of modern baleen whales were toothy not-so-gentle giants - Guest Work

Guest Work May 14, 2018

Felix Georg Marx, Monash University and Robert Ewan Fordyce The largest living whales – including the gigantic 30-metre blue whale – are fast predatory hunters that support their massive bodies by filtering large volumes of tiny prey from cool near-polar waters. They do this using baleen: plates of a tough substance hanging from their upper jaw. Evidence … Read More

The SMC Video Competition: History of David Glacier from the Cosmos to Atoms - Guest Work

Jean Balchin Apr 10, 2018

Recently, the results of the Science Media Centre Video Competition were revealed. It was an incredible competition, open to previous participants of the SMC’s science video workshops. There were eight entries, and the judges were incredibly impressed with the creativity and quality of the entries. I was fortunate enough to watch all eight entries and chat to a number of … Read More

Cool! Antarctic krill can turn microplastics into nanoplastics - News

Jean Balchin Mar 09, 2018

A groundbreaking Griffith University study has found Antarctic krill which ingest microplastics are able to turn them into nanoplastics through digestion. What are Krill? Krill is a general term used to refer to around 85 species of free-swimming crustaceans called euphausiids, of which Antarctic krill is one species. Antarctic krill are one of the most abundant and successful animal species on … Read More

Why remote Antarctica is so important in a warming world - Guest Work

Guest Work Dec 07, 2017

Chris Fogwill, Keele University; Chris Turney, UNSW, and Zoe Robinson, Keele University Ever since the ancient Greeks speculated a continent must exist in the south polar regions to balance those in the north, Antarctica has been popularly described as remote and extreme. Over the past two centuries, these factors have combined to create, … Read More

Why are talks over an East Antarctic marine park still deadlocked? - Guest Work

Guest Work Nov 05, 2017

By Cassandra Brooks, University of Colorado. Last week, representatives from 24 countries plus the European Union met in Hobart to discuss plans for a vast marine protected area (MPA) off the coast of East Antarctica. The proposed area, spanning almost 1 million square km, is crucial for a vast array of marine life. Scientists, conservationists and governments … Read More

Antarctic ice reveals that fossil fuel extraction leaks more methane than thought - Guest Work

Guest Work Aug 24, 2017

By Hinrich Schaefer, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric The fossil fuel industry is a larger contributor to atmospheric methane levels than previously thought, according to our research which shows that natural seepage of this potent greenhouse gas from oil and gas reservoirs is more modest than had been assumed. In our research, published in Nature today, … Read More

When artists get involved in research, science benefits - Guest Work

Guest Work Aug 17, 2017

By Craig Stevens and Gabby O’Connor When artists and scientists get together, creative sparks can fly. Collaborative sci-art projects are increasingly popular and one obvious benefit is the greater visibility of the research through the artist’s work. Our project explored scientific and artistic aspects of Antarctic ice crystals. But what’s in it for the … Read More

Cows in Antarctica? How one expedition milked them for all their worth - Guest Work

Guest Work Aug 14, 2017

By Hanne E.F. Nielsen, University of Tasmania and Elizabeth Leane, University of Tasmania Domestic animals are rarely associated with Antarctica. However, before non-native species (bar humans) were excluded from the continent in the 1990s, many travelled to the far south. These animals included not only the obvious sledge dogs, but also ponies, sheep, … Read More

I’ve studied Larsen C and its giant iceberg for years – it’s not a simple story of climate change - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 13, 2017

Adrian Luckman, Swansea University One of the largest icebergs ever recorded has just broken away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica. Over the past few years I’ve led a team that has been studying this ice shelf and monitoring change. We spent many weeks camped on the ice investigating melt ponds and their impact – and … Read More