Tagged: Antarctica

I’ve studied Larsen C and its giant iceberg for years – it’s not a simple story of climate change - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 13, 2017

Adrian Luckman, Swansea University One of the largest icebergs ever recorded has just broken away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica. Over the past few years I’ve led a team that has been studying this ice shelf and monitoring change. We spent many weeks camped on the ice investigating melt ponds and their impact – and … Read More

Three Inspiring Biology Reads - Pointing At Science

Steve Pointing Jul 07, 2017

Here are the top three readings that have inspired me in science. What do you think? What are your favourite articles?   #3 Endolithic microorganisms in the Antarctic cold desert by Imre Friedmann Emperor Penguins huddling together in Antarctica. I was truly fortunate to work briefly with Imre Friedmann when he was at NASA Ames Research Center. Read More

The winners and losers of Antarctica’s great thaw - Guest Work

Guest Work Jun 30, 2017

By Jasmine Lee, The University of Queensland; Justine Shaw, The University of Queensland, and Richard Fuller, The University of Queensland When you think of Antarctica, you probably picture vast, continuous ice sheets and glaciers, with maybe a penguin or two thrown in. Yet most Antarctic plants and animals live in the permanently ice-free areas … Read More

Volcanoes under the ice: melting Antarctic ice could fight climate change - Guest Work

Guest Work Jun 16, 2017

By Silvia Frisia, University of Newcastle  Iron is not commonly famous for its role as a micronutrient for tiny organisms dwelling in the cold waters of polar oceans. But iron feeds plankton, which in turn hold carbon dioxide in their bodies. When they die, the creatures sink to the bottom of the sea, safely storing that carbon. How exactly … Read More

The challenge and importance of predicting sea-level rise - Guest Work

Guest Work Feb 06, 2017

By Prof Tim Naish, Director of the Antarctic Research Centre, Victoria University Wellington By the end of the century it is predicted that rising sea-level will directly impact more than 200 million people around the world. The damage to property and infrastructure, groundwater, and the prospect of widespread displacement of people will indirectly affect every one of us on this … Read More

Scientist keeps cool head on the ice - Field Work

Guest Work Jan 10, 2017

NIWA marine physicist Dr Natalie Robinson. Top of Natalie Robinson’s to-do list right now is to work out exactly what she’s brought back from Antarctica. The NIWA marine physicist has recently spent five weeks on the ice leading a team of researchers trying to solve one of the great conundrums facing scientists researching climate change: why has Antarctic sea ice … Read More

What lies beneath Antarctica’s ice? - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 19, 2016

Christine Dow, University of Waterloo; Felicity Graham, University of Tasmania, and Sue Cook, University of Tasmania There are few frontiers in the world that can still be said to be unexplored. One of these terra incognita is the land beneath Antarctica’s ice sheets. Buried under kilometres of ice is a fascinating realm of canyons, … Read More

Shrinking hole in the ozone layer shows what collective action can achieve - Guest Work

Guest Work Jul 06, 2016

By Anja Schmidt, University of Leeds and Ryan Neely, University of Leeds The hole in the ozone layer was first discovered in 1985 by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey, who described how ozone levels above the Antarctic were steadily dropping compared to the previous decade. This was quickly recognised as a severe environmental problem … Read More

Extensive seafloor investigations to begin off NZ coast next year - News

Erica Mather Jun 02, 2016

The world’s largest geoscience programme has confirmed after years of planning that a series of unprecedented investigations of the seafloor will take place off New Zealand’s coast between 2017 and 2018. Hundreds of scientists from 26 countries including New Zealand form the International Ocean Discovery Programme (IODP) who announced this week that JOIDES Resolution , a research … Read More

Antarctic glacier’s unstable past reveals danger of future melting - Guest Work

Guest Work May 19, 2016

By Alan Aitken, University of Western Australia New mapping of one of the most remote areas in Antarctica has revealed regions deep within Earth’s largest ice sheet that are particularly prone to rapid melting. Our study, published today in Nature, is focused on East Antarctica’s Totten Glacier, the outlet for the world’s largest ice catchment. The results … Read More