Tagged: archaeology

We know why short-statured people of Flores became small – but for the extinct ‘Hobbit’ it’s not so clear - Guest Work

Guest Author Aug 04, 2018

Michael Westaway, Griffith University and Francis David Bulbeck, Australian National University Humans are diverse in size and shape – but some populations are of relatively low average height, and historically described using the term “pygmy”. Some researchers have suggested that the Rampasasa inhabitants of the Flores highlands of Indonesia are one such group. A paper published … Read More

Fossil Lucky Dip from a Lost World - Lost Worlds, Vanished Lives

Nic Rawlence Jul 10, 2018

I’m lying on a beautiful golden sand beach. The bright sun is beating down upon me. I could be on an isolated, tropical island, if not for the lone giant moa sculpture looming above my head. This sentinel to a lost world stands at the aptly named Old Bones Backpackers at Awamoa, (originally named Te Awa Kōkōmuka), south of Oamaru. Read More

The revolution that wasn’t: African tools push back the origins of human technological innovation - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 22, 2018

Patrick Randolph-Quinney, University of Central Lancashire and Anthony Sinclair, University of Liverpool This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Just 20 years ago, many archaeologists believed there was a “human revolution” 40,000-50,000 years ago during which modern behaviours such as symbolism, innovation and art suddenly arose. This was thought … Read More

60 years in orbit for ‘grapefruit satellite’ – the oldest human object in space - Guest Work

Guest Author Mar 22, 2018

Alice Gorman, Flinders University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Sixty years ago, a grapefruit-sized aluminium sphere with six antennas and some tiny solar cells was launched into Earth orbit. The Vanguard 1 satellite is still up there and is the oldest human-made object in space. It’s our first … Read More

A hadrosaur dinosaur in Mexico and a science conscious Mother - Digging the Dirt

Brigid Gallagher Jul 24, 2013

Today I had a flash back.  Our 3 year old was having a pout about not seeing any bones at the Auckland Art gallery and that they had not been to the museum.  And our 6 year old was describing her favorite pieces at the Gallery which were the Maori designs and patterns…and I thought… HANG ON A MINUTE!!! GRRRRRUUPPTTTTT, … Read More

3-D X-Ray is Big News for Archaeological Research - Digging the Dirt

Brigid Gallagher Sep 13, 2012

ArtInfo has released an article today which has me very excited, and thinking of ways it could be used in New Zealand archaeology.   Instead of having to consolidate (or glue together) a fragile pot, urn, vessel, or block of loose soil,  with low concentrate adhesives, co-polymers, acrylics and the like, And then slowly micro-excavate the contents inside by hand (with really small tools, … Read More