Tagged: artificial intelligence

Biology’s next revolution - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Sep 09, 2019

  A quarter of a century ago, when I thought my future was in science, automation and the idea of “big data” had just arrived for genetics. Automated sequencing, mathematical models, algorithms. Similar innovations spread to others areas of biology through things like better sensors, imaging systems, smarter radio tags for wildlife, data-loggers, and the like. Wet labs … Read More

Cheesecake Files: Machine learning heart attacks - Kidney Punch

John Pickering Aug 21, 2019

“Machine learning” rates very high on the buzz-word scale, right up there with “nano-technology” and “blockchain”. Like most buzz it is more noise than substance. However, every now and again it looks like there might be something in the noise that bites. This episode of the Cheesecake Files1 is about testing an algorithm (another buzz word) developed through a … Read More

Could AI be the answer to our productivity woes? - FutureworkNZ

Guest Author Jul 04, 2019

Judy Kavanagh    Regardless of the technology hype, we’re in a productivity slump worldwide. Will it rebound as robotics and AI deliver a boost? A couple of weeks ago I attended the OECD Global Forum on Productivity in Sydney with the not so snappy title “Keeping pace with technological change: The role of capabilities and dynamism”. My … Read More

Is the post-2012 acceleration in automation tech sustainable? - FutureworkNZ

Dave Heatley Jun 28, 2019

Can automation tech keep improving at the current rate? First, how good is today’s AI-enabled software? There is no question that it is a lot better at specific tasks than its predecessors. These tasks are more than toys – they include classifying photos, language translation, speech recognition and text synthesis. My photo library has lived on … Read More

Which technologies drive concern over the future of work? - FutureworkNZ

Dave Heatley Jun 24, 2019

Biotech. Nanotech. Cleantech. Gene tech. Cloud computing tech. Successive waves of technological change are the norm for those of us in the developed world. These waves typically rise, peak and ebb while barely raising a concern about wider labour market effects. Further, it seems strange to be worrying about unemployment – technologically induced or otherwise – when, according to The … Read More

Call for independent watchdog to monitor NZ government use of artificial intelligence - Guest Work

Guest Author May 27, 2019

John Zerilli, University of Otago and Colin Gavaghan, University of Otago New Zealand is a leader in government use of artificial intelligence (AI). It is part of a global network of countries that use predictive algorithms in government decision making, for anything from the optimal scheduling of public hospital beds to whether an offender should … Read More

Is the future of work happening now? - FutureworkNZ

Guest Author May 20, 2019

Nik Green   Many people worry about the impact of new and emerging technologies like robots and artificial intelligence on the number and quality of jobs. But we tend to overlook how frequently the labour market changes in the ordinary course of events, and the role that technology plays in this change. We can see these developments in a couple of … Read More

Futures of work - Ariadne

Robert Hickson Mar 27, 2019

It’s hard to find a way through the forest of forecasts about the impact new technologies will have on work and life. Is it going to be terrible, awesome, same same, all of the above, or something else? The answer is no one knows, or can really know. However, it’s useful to explore the issues and consider what policy options … Read More

‘Please Alexa’: are we beginning to recognise the rights of intelligent machines? - Guest Work

Guest Author Jun 22, 2018

Paresh Kathrani, University of Westminster Amazon has recently developed an option whereby Alexa will only activate if people address it with a “please”. This suggests that we are starting to recognise some intelligent machines in a way that was previously reserved only for humans. In fact, this could very well be the first step towards recognising the … Read More